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permutable

Line breaks: per¦mut|able
Pronunciation: /pəˈmjuːtəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of permutable in English:

adjective

1Liable to change.
Example sentences
  • The Williamsburg four-piece, in the current version of their permutable lineup, delivers an all-around solid EP.
  • Proteins' maddeningly intricate and all too permutable chains of peptides and amino acids were at the heart of the challenge of creating their new approach.
  • They follow a very permutable border between organization and movement.
2Able to be changed or exchanged.
Example sentences
  • Students might try to find other of these "absolute" or "permutable" primes.
  • In mathematical parlance, the prime number 113 is said to be permutable because it remains prime regardless of how the digits are arranged, that is 131 and 311.
  • Some letters are permutable, being such in general as are formed by the same organs.

Origin

late Middle English: from late Latin permutabilis 'liable to change, changeable', from permutare (see permute) + -able.

Definition of permutable in:

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