Definition of perpetrate in English:

perpetrate

Line breaks: per|pet¦rate
Pronunciation: /ˈpəːpɪtreɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

perpetration

Pronunciation: /-ˈtreɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • Four youths were arrested on criminal charges, including third-degree assault, harassment and perpetration of a hate crime.
  • Instead, the indictment charges him with having planned, ordered, instigated, or assisted in the perpetration of these crimes.
  • To my way of thinking, ‘crime’ is defined as the perpetration of harm upon an ‘innocent’ victim.

perpetrator

noun
More example sentences
  • However, the call proved to be a hoax and the perpetrator remains unknown to the police.
  • They exercise effective command, control, or authority over the perpetrators.
  • The perpetrator must be rooted out and punished for his unacceptable action.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin perpetrat- 'performed', from the verb perpetrare, from per- 'to completion' + patrare 'bring about'. In Latin the act perpetrated might be good or bad; in English the verb was first used in the statutes referring to crime, hence the negative association.

Usage

The words perpetrate and perpetuate are sometimes confused. Perpetrate means ‘commit a harmful, illegal, or immoral action’, as in a crime has been perpetrated against a sovereign state , whereas perpetuate means ‘make something continue indefinitely’, as in a monument to perpetuate the memory of those killed in the war .

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