Definition of petard in English:

petard

Line breaks: pe¦tard
Pronunciation: /pɪˈtɑːd
 
/

noun

historical
1A small bomb made of a metal or wooden box filled with powder, used to blast down a door or to make a hole in a wall.
More example sentences
  • Machine guns in front and on the flank opened fire, while petards, bombs, and artillery fire covered the entire area of the trenches with projectiles.
  • The various applications are discussed briefly, from guns and artillery to petards (bombs for blowing down castle doors), rockets, and military mines.
1.1A kind of firework that explodes with a sharp report.
More example sentences
  • After lots of petards, fireworks, pyrotechnics, the best policy for spending New Year’s Eve is to be surrounded by great company, friends, good music, food and drink, and following with joyful waking up and sunshine!
  • The next negative aspect is the noise and other pollution caused by fireworks, especially the petards that get more powerful year by year.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French pétard, from péter 'break wind'.

Phrases

be hoist with (or by) one's own petard

Have one’s plans to cause trouble for others backfire on one.
[from Shakespeare's Hamlet ( iii. iv. 207); hoist is in the sense 'lifted and removed', past participle of dialect hoise (see hoist)]
More example sentences
  • Charges of working against the interests of your own country are very slippery things, and may get the one making the charges hoisted by his own petard someday.
  • But, with any luck, he may soon be hoisted by his own petard.
  • He's been at if for years and he finally got hoisted by his own petard.

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Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected