There are 5 main definitions of pike in English:

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pike1

Line breaks: pike
Pronunciation: /pʌɪk
 
/

noun (plural same)

1A long-bodied predatory freshwater fish with a pointed snout and large teeth, of both Eurasia and North America.
  • Family Esocidae and genus Esox: five species, including the widespread northern pike (E. lucius)
Example sentences
  • Being the main apex predator found in freshwaters, pike are not as common as other fish.
  • There are herring and cod in the outer archipelago, but within casting range of land the fish are mostly fresh-water - perch, bream, pike, and zander.
  • Paul contacted the Environment Agency and Yorkshire Water, which are now investigating the cause of the deaths of a number of fish including pike, eels and roach.
1.1Used in names of predatory fish with large teeth other than the true pike, e.g. garpike.
Example sentences
  • The long-nosed garpike is common everywhere in shallow water.
  • The department may designate certain waters in which a rubber or spring propelled spear may be used for the taking of carp, dogfish, garpike, and suckers.
  • It can save you lots of time reeling in grass pike, and a pocket full of money on lost baits, if you invest in a couple weed less baits for your tackle box.

Origin

Middle English: from pike2 (because of the fish's pointed jaw).

More
  • The earliest recorded meaning of pike is for a pickaxe, pick simply being a variant form of pike. The freshwater fish the pike gets its name from the resemblance of its long pointed jaw to the old infantry weapon called a pike, which has a pointed steel or iron head on a long shaft. While basically the same word as Old English pike, this came into English during the 16th century from French piquer ‘to pierce’. In dialect piked ‘pointed’ became picked and then peaked, and this is probably the origin of the word peak (Late Middle English) for the pointed top of something such as a mountain. The Australian and New Zealand expressions to pike out, ‘to withdraw or go back on a plan or agreement’, and to pike on, ‘to let someone down’, go back to a 15th- and 16th-century use to pike yourself ‘to provide yourself with a pilgrim's pike or staff’, and so ‘to depart, leave’. See also plain

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There are 5 main definitions of pike in English:

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pike2

Line breaks: pike
Pronunciation: /pʌɪk
 
/

noun

1 historical An infantry weapon with a pointed steel or iron head on a long wooden shaft.
Example sentences
  • Vast quantities of clothing, gunpowder, pikes, halberds, swords, and muskets poured out of the workshops of the metropolis.
  • The invention and proliferation of the ring bayonet in the 1690s led to the disappearance of the pike as a standard infantry weapon.
  • Dixira stopped abruptly, his nose inches from the wooden shafts of the pikes.
2Northern English (In names of hills in the Lake District) a hill with a peaked top: Scafell Pike
More example sentences
  • At 978 metres (3209 feet), Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England. It is located in the Lake District National Park in Cumbria.
  • Although the lowest of the three country tops of Scotland, Wales and England, Scafell Pike is perhaps the hardest to get to.
  • Many people walk up Scafell Pike each day - but beware of following the crowd!

verb

[with object] historical Back to top  
Kill or thrust (someone) through with a pike: many prisoners were taken out and piked

Origin

early 16th century: from French pique, back-formation from piquer 'pierce', from pic 'pick, pike'; compare with Old English pīc 'point, prick' (of unknown origin). (sense 2) of the noun) is apparently of Scandinavian origin; compare with West Norwegian dialect pīk 'pointed mountain'.

More
  • The earliest recorded meaning of pike is for a pickaxe, pick simply being a variant form of pike. The freshwater fish the pike gets its name from the resemblance of its long pointed jaw to the old infantry weapon called a pike, which has a pointed steel or iron head on a long shaft. While basically the same word as Old English pike, this came into English during the 16th century from French piquer ‘to pierce’. In dialect piked ‘pointed’ became picked and then peaked, and this is probably the origin of the word peak (Late Middle English) for the pointed top of something such as a mountain. The Australian and New Zealand expressions to pike out, ‘to withdraw or go back on a plan or agreement’, and to pike on, ‘to let someone down’, go back to a 15th- and 16th-century use to pike yourself ‘to provide yourself with a pilgrim's pike or staff’, and so ‘to depart, leave’. See also plain

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There are 5 main definitions of pike in English:

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pike3

Line breaks: pike
Pronunciation: /pʌɪk
 
/

noun

North American
short for turnpike.
Example sentences
  • The National Road becomes known as the National Pike, as some of the states erect toll houses to collect fees from those using the Pike.
  • Maryland's Baltimore to Cumberland section of the Historic National Road was designated the Historic National Pike.
  • Towns and cities along the pike began to spring up to provide comforts for weary travelers heading west. Modern travelers of the Historic National Pike will find communities proud of their vibrant heritage.

Phrases

come down the pike

1
informal Appear on the scene; come to notice: it’s one of the better sports movies to come down the pike in some time
More example sentences
  • The fact that the president has decided to schedule a ‘major speech’ terrorism, apropos of more or less nothing, would seem to suggest some bad coming down the pike.
  • So, without belaboring the point, let's just stipulate that there were probably some problems coming down the pike for Brown's nomination even if he hadn't had this nanny problem come up.
  • And so I contacted the Department of Workforce Development and they said, Well, we know it might be coming down the pike, we might award this contract.

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There are 5 main definitions of pike in English:

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pike4

Line breaks: pike
Pronunciation: /pʌɪk
 
/

noun

[often as modifier]
A jackknife position in diving or gymnastics.
Example sentences
  • Chusovitina's full-twisting front somersault vault in open pike position earned her first place on that event.
  • A good freestyle turn should be started in a pike position.
  • Now bring the ball closer to your hands by bending at the waist until you achieve an inverted pike position.

Origin

1920s: of unknown origin.

More
  • The earliest recorded meaning of pike is for a pickaxe, pick simply being a variant form of pike. The freshwater fish the pike gets its name from the resemblance of its long pointed jaw to the old infantry weapon called a pike, which has a pointed steel or iron head on a long shaft. While basically the same word as Old English pike, this came into English during the 16th century from French piquer ‘to pierce’. In dialect piked ‘pointed’ became picked and then peaked, and this is probably the origin of the word peak (Late Middle English) for the pointed top of something such as a mountain. The Australian and New Zealand expressions to pike out, ‘to withdraw or go back on a plan or agreement’, and to pike on, ‘to let someone down’, go back to a 15th- and 16th-century use to pike yourself ‘to provide yourself with a pilgrim's pike or staff’, and so ‘to depart, leave’. See also plain

Definition of pike in:

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There are 5 main definitions of pike in English:

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pike5

Line breaks: pike
Pronunciation: /pʌɪk
 
/

verb

[no object] Australian /NZ informal
1 (pike out) Withdraw from or go back on (a plan or agreement).
Example sentences
  • However I am fighting an almost overwhelming desire to pike out and spend the weekend under the duvet eating chocolate.
  • John and James pike out leaving me and Rick to head up to the bar to get a couple of drinks before heading to bed.
  • Then I thought ‘Oh well, there go all my readers overly-protected by various ‘inappropriate content’ filters ’, such as are found in all too many libraries, so I piked out.
2 (pike on) Let (someone) down.
Example sentences
  • I might pike on things on the weekend so I can work on my birthday dress.

Origin

late Middle English (as pike oneself 'take up a pilgrim's staff'): compare with Danish pigge af 'hasten off'. The current senses date from the mid 20th century.

More
  • The earliest recorded meaning of pike is for a pickaxe, pick simply being a variant form of pike. The freshwater fish the pike gets its name from the resemblance of its long pointed jaw to the old infantry weapon called a pike, which has a pointed steel or iron head on a long shaft. While basically the same word as Old English pike, this came into English during the 16th century from French piquer ‘to pierce’. In dialect piked ‘pointed’ became picked and then peaked, and this is probably the origin of the word peak (Late Middle English) for the pointed top of something such as a mountain. The Australian and New Zealand expressions to pike out, ‘to withdraw or go back on a plan or agreement’, and to pike on, ‘to let someone down’, go back to a 15th- and 16th-century use to pike yourself ‘to provide yourself with a pilgrim's pike or staff’, and so ‘to depart, leave’. See also plain

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