There are 2 definitions of pine in English:

pine1

Line breaks: pine
Pronunciation: /pʌɪn
 
/

noun

1 (also pine tree) An evergreen coniferous tree which has clusters of long needle-shaped leaves. Many kinds are grown for the soft timber, which is widely used for furniture and pulp, or for tar and turpentine. Compare with fir.
  • Genus Pinus, family Pinaceae: many species, including the Scots pine and stone pine
More example sentences
  • Hollyhock landed in a low branch of a pine tree, and dangled there as she tried to find a way to get down.
  • He apparently struck a pine tree on the edge of a wheat field before crashing into the field at a steep angle, LaRoche said.
  • Holly leaned back on a pine tree, and thought about their problem.
1.1Used in names of coniferous trees of families other than that of the pine, e.g. Chile pine.
1.2Used in names of unrelated plants that resemble the pines in some way, e.g. ground pine, screw pine.
1.3 [as modifier] Having the scent of pine needles: pine potpourri
More example sentences
  • I pulled my boyfriend away, pressing my face into his beautiful black hair, breathing in the heady scent of pine needles.
  • Perhaps it was a faint scent of pine needles that hung in the air, perhaps it was the clarity with which she viewed the scenes played out before her.
  • She nearly choked as the overwhelming scent of pine needles hit her.
2 informal , chiefly West Indian A pineapple.

Origin

Old English, from Latin pinus, reinforced in Middle English by Old French pin.

Derivatives

pinery

noun

Definition of pine in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

There are 2 definitions of pine in English:

pine2

Line breaks: pine
Pronunciation: /pʌɪn
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Suffer a mental and physical decline, especially because of a broken heart: she thinks I am pining away from love
More example sentences
  • He was actually worrying and pining in his heart, but he could not say anything.
  • Surely the Phantom suffered through worse all those hours pining after that lovely chorus girl.
  • Not just in a figure of speech kind of way, but genuinely in love - jittery in its presence, pining during its absence, utterly fulfilled and completed during the time you spend with it?
Synonyms
languish, decline, go into a decline, lose strength, weaken, waste away, dwindle, wilt, wither, fade, flag, sicken, droop, brood, mope, moon
archaic peak
yearn, long, ache, sigh, hunger, thirst, itch, languish, carry a torch; miss, mourn, lament, grieve over, cry/weep over, fret about, shed tears for, bemoan, rue, regret the loss/absence of, hanker for/after, eat one's heart out over, cry out for
1.1 (pine for) Miss or long for: she’s still pining for him
More example sentences
  • Once this happens, our bodies will no longer crave toxins and my pining for chicken popcorn will fade.
  • The first semester was okay, but after Christmas I started to pine for home, wishing I was closer, that I could just be there.
  • His children, who are pining for their father, are being cared for by relatives and told that their father is away working hard to raise case to take them to Disneyland Paris.

Origin

Old English pīnian '(cause to) suffer', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pijnen, German peinen 'experience pain', also to obsolete pine 'punishment'; ultimately based on Latin poena 'punishment'.

Definition of pine in: