Definition of plenitude in English:

plenitude

Line breaks: pleni|tude
Pronunciation: /ˈplɛnɪtjuːd
 
/

noun

1An abundance: an ancient Celtic god thought to bring a plenitude of wealth or food
More example sentences
  • But ‘monarchs need an absence of direct toxins, a plenitude of milkweed, and a plenitude of nectar sources.’
  • Now that I'm doing my Ph.D. at Cambridge, things are a little different; greater flexibility to plan my schedule, a tremendous expanse of beautiful, open countryside, a plenitude of paths and pavements to explore.
  • During his residence he collected a plenitude of ethnographica for the ethnographical museums in Berlin, Leipzig, and Stuttgart.
1.1 [mass noun] The condition of being full or complete: the plenitude of the Pope’s powers
More example sentences
  • That mirage, or intuition, revelation or dream opposes order to disorder, plenitude to emptiness, and to disgust wonder, hope, enthusiasm.
  • But does this aesthetic plenitude really help?
  • Goldwater, in short, was a politician of ideas, not knee-jerk reaction or pork-barrel plenitude.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from late Latin plenitudo, from plenus 'full'.

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