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pollard

Line breaks: pol|lard
Pronunciation: /ˈpɒləd
 
/

Definition of pollard in English:

verb

[with object] (often as adjective pollarded)
Cut off the top and branches of (a tree) to encourage new growth at the top: a wide boulevard lined with pollarded lime trees
More example sentences
  • When they are more mature, the trees will be pollarded (the main branches are trimmed back to the trunk) regularly to keep them shapely and compact.
  • There are reports of the tree being pollarded in 1908, 1955, 1962, 1963/4, 1968, 1970 and 1991.
  • Many of these pollarded trees still remain in our streets and shopping centres, though they are gradually being replaced with smaller species.

noun

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1A tree whose top and branches have been pollarded: young trees have grown up between the pollards [as modifier]: a row of pollard willows
More example sentences
  • Hoopoes breed across most of Europe, except Scandinavia, favouring open country and clumps of old trees including pollard willows, meadows orchards and olive plantations.
  • Its interest is that within it survive all the elements of a medieval forest: great timber trees, coppice woods, pollards, scrub, grassland and fen, deer and cattle, and a rabbit warren.
  • Continue along the path with the river and lines of oak pollards on your left, and the grazed meadow, which is rich with wild herbs in the summer, on your right.
2 archaic An animal that has lost its horns or cast its antlers.
Example sentences
  • In some cases such pollards have small horny growths in the skin where their horns would be.

Origin

early 17th century: from the verb poll + -ard.

Words that rhyme with pollard

collard, Lollard

Definition of pollard in:

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