There are 2 definitions of pooch in English:

pooch1

Line breaks: pooch
Pronunciation: /puːtʃ
 
/

noun

informal
A dog.
More example sentences
  • He's done a whole lot of paintings of pooches - yappy dogs, poodles, some mutts and a few bulldogs.
  • Sweet smells drifted through the drizzle from the food hall where local producers had set up stall while welly-wearing visitors headed under canvas to the handiwork in the craft tent and the pampered pooches in the dog tent.
  • Dog owners have their pooches swiped on the street, are belaboured about the face and neck, and the whole incident is captured on video phones for the entertainment of witless youths.

Origin

1920s: of unknown origin.

Definition of pooch in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

There are 2 definitions of pooch in English:

pooch2

Line breaks: pooch
Pronunciation: /puːtʃ
 
/

verb

US informal
Protrude or cause to protrude: [no object]: a dress that made her stomach pooch out even more than usual
More example sentences
  • Plus, it doesn't matter how slim you are, when you sit down every woman gets a little bit of skin pooching over the top at the side when she wears super low-riders.
  • ‘Give momma some sugah,’ Penny cooed, pooching her lips out in an odd, grotesque manner.
  • Alberto's lips pooched out in a sad, nostalgic smile.

Origin

mid 17th century: from the noun pouch.

Definition of pooch in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict