There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port1

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/

noun

1A town or city with a harbour or access to navigable water where ships load or unload: the French port of Toulon [in place names]: Port Elizabeth
More example sentences
  • Over 33 ships are waiting at Colombian ports to load and unload cargo.
  • Voting patterns suggest that market towns, such as ports and cities located on rivers, favored penitentiaries.
  • British agents developed a one-man midget submarine specifically to target enemy shipping anchored in ports or inshore waters.
Synonyms
seaport, port city/town; Frenchentrepôt
1.1A harbour: [as modifier]: Belfast’s port facilities
More example sentences
  • Speaking of Umm Qasr, work continues on the upgrade of the port facilities.
  • The special facilities, which could be drained to allow repairs on ships' hulls, have been closed and the heavy machinery dismantled and moved to Liverpool's port.
  • Our call was in the nearby port facility of Puerto Cones, which served as a launching point for excursions to the nearby Mayan ruins.
Synonyms

Origin

Old English, from Latin portus 'haven, harbour', reinforced in Middle English by Old French.

Phrases

any port in a storm

proverb In adverse circumstances one welcomes any source of relief or escape: Dora’s eye fell on him—any port in a storm
More example sentences
  • Now admittedly, there was a small number of young eligible male teens involved in this world, and only about the same number of young females so I suspect it was any port in a storm in her view.
  • I didn't know where all the newfound energy came from, but any port in a storm.

port of call

A place where a ship stops on a voyage.
More example sentences
  • It is not confirmed whether Sligo will be a port of call as the ship sails on a day to day basis, depending on weather conditions.
  • One of the most popular ports of call for Caribbean cruise ships is St. Thomas, one of the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  • Today it is one of the major ports of call for Caribbean cruise ships where hundreds of passengers are welcomed every week.
A point, typically one of a series, at which one stops briefly or to which one has recourse during a journey or procedure: his last port of call that day was the bank
More example sentences
  • One of my first ports of call after landing in the capital was to the Washington Foreign Press Center, where I vaguely knew a correspondent through a friend of a friend.
  • The Pakistani Advice Centre is the first port of call for many of these city residents, acting as a citizens' advice bureau.
  • Country hotels are always my first port of call in a strange town.

port of entry

A harbour or airport where customs officers are stationed to oversee people and goods entering or leaving a country.
More example sentences
  • Ted Stevens International Airport is the only port of entry to Anchorage and is located about 20 minutes southwest of the base.
  • Ambouli International Airport is the only port of entry to Djibouti and is located within Djibouti City.
  • Southern border overflight exemptions, which allow users to bypass the nearest port of entry and proceed to another airport to clear customs, have not been affected.

Definition of port in:

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Word of the day fioritura
Pronunciation: fɪˌɔːrɪˈt(j)ʊərə
noun
an embellishment of a melody...

There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port2

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/
(also port wine)

noun

[mass noun]
A strong, sweet dark red (occasionally brown or white) fortified wine, originally from Portugal, typically drunk as a dessert wine: they settled down to a final glass of port [count noun]: tawny ports do not need decanting
More example sentences
  • In particular, I want to drive up the Douro valley from Porto to the vineyards where the grapes for port wine are grown, and I want to see more of the estuaries of the Galician coast.
  • I wished for some kick in the red-chile steak butter I asked for with my bison filet, as a substitute for the advertised port wine sauce.
  • Apart from the seasonal connotations that cinnamon, oranges, Stilton and mulled port wine have, I think Stilton might make an even tangier and more contrasting accompaniment to the sweet jelly.

Origin

shortened form of Oporto, a major port from which the wine is shipped.

Definition of port in:

There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port3

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/

noun

The side of a ship or aircraft that is on the left when one is facing forward: the ferry was listing to port [as modifier]: the port side of the aircraft The opposite of starboard.
More example sentences
  • The lumbering shuttle lazily side slipped from port to starboard and back in futile attempts to shake off pursuit.
  • Pressure and gravity refueling receptacles are installed in the aft port fuel cell.
  • One of them noticed an object in the water outboard and to port of the wake, astern of the vessel.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Turn (a ship or its helm) to port: the yacht immediately raised all sail and ported her helm
More example sentences
  • The captain slowed and ported the vessel to pass around the monolith, and everyone took a good look at the horrid idol.
  • Reaching the dock where my ship was being ported, Steve and I got on board.
  • The US Supreme Court has heard a case concerning whether the Americans With Disabilities Act applies to foreign cruise ships porting in US harbors.

Origin

mid 16th century: probably originally the side containing an entry port or facing the port (quayside) for loading.

Definition of port in:

There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port4

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/

noun

1An opening in the side of a ship for boarding or loading.
More example sentences
  • Then came the rumbling of the heavy artillery being rolled down the street to the loading ports; the men in the way scattering like flies.
  • The dull thuds of boarding shuttles connecting to the liner's docking ports reverberated through the ship.
  • Once you learn to avoid the numerous ports and hatches, you will find this a very safe and easy deck to move about on, particularly while sailing at normal angles of heel.
1.1A porthole: the cabin has rectangular ports set just below sheer in each quarter
More example sentences
  • Aside from the companionway, there is no ventilation, windows or ports so if the companionway were to be closed in inclement weather the cabin would get uncomfortable.
  • Deck hardware and fixed cabin ports are bronze and there are teak louvered doors leading to the cabin.
  • He stared out the port a long time before he heard her come below.
1.2 (also gun port) An opening in the body of an aircraft or in a wall or armoured vehicle through which a gun may be fired.
More example sentences
  • Crowstep gables and a small gun port in the back wall are a structural reminder of the transition from fortified house to mansion.
  • The gun port was twice its normal size, with jagged wooden chards to frame the opening.
  • She grabbed up a coil of rope on her way up the ladder and looked out over the side of the boat, then tied one end of the rope around the mainmast and dropped it through the gun port.
1.3An opening for the passage of steam, liquid, or gas: loss of fuel from the exhaust port
More example sentences
  • Turbos are closely coupled to the exhaust ports.
  • Steam and smoke emanated from the different ports and hoses that came loose, filling the small area around it with a somewhat vague but visible mist.
  • The right wing could only operate at fifty percent, and also had several damaged servomotors, and melted exhaust ports.
Synonyms
aperture, opening, outlet, inlet, socket, vent, passage, porthole, trap, embrasure, door, gate
2 Electronics A socket in a computer network into which a device can be plugged: a communications port for optional cellular and other wireless modules
More example sentences
  • Each repeater examines its local network ports to computer stations such as PC's to determine if any are inputting data to the repeater.
  • The network is maintained using infrared, X10 protocol and even USB communication ports, he says.
  • The data transfer network comprises a plurality of communication ports and a plurality of modules.
3chiefly Scottish A gate or gateway, especially into a walled city.

Origin

Old English (in the sense 'gateway'), from Latin porta 'gate'; reinforced in Middle English by Old French porte. The later sense 'opening in the side of a ship' led to the general sense 'aperture'.

Definition of port in:

There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port5

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/

verb

[with object and adverbial of direction]
1 Computing Transfer (software) from one system or machine to another: the software can be ported to practically any platform
More example sentences
  • I went to art school, got into programming during the dot com bubble, moved into games development, hopped over to pre-press programming and I now work as a programmer porting software.
  • It provides a way of writing device-independent graphical and windowing software that can be ported easily from one machine to another.
  • Likewise, porting software from one architecture to another is complex, rare, and costly, Weber added.
2Carry or convey: we ported the milk cans from the plentiful water supply of the gym
More example sentences
  • Driving taxis and buses, porting baggage at the airport, and working in shops are among the types of employment that the Hageners pursue.
2.1 [with object, often in imperative] Military Carry (a rifle or other weapon) diagonally across and close to the body with the barrel or blade near the left shoulder: Detail! For inspection—port arms!

noun

Back to top  
1 Military The position required by an order to port a weapon: Parker had his rifle at the port
2 literary A person’s carriage or bearing: she has the proud port of a princess
3 Computing A transfer of software from one system or machine to another: the first port of a commercial database to this operating system
More example sentences
  • It was even beginning to attract ports of commercial applications software.
  • Without actually sitting down and benchmarking it, it feels identical to the laptop's ports in terms of transfer speed.
  • The rest of the guys were the established players and didn't ask their customers to suffer huge software ports.

Origin

Middle English (in (sense 2) of the noun)): from Old French port 'bearing, gait', from the verb porter, from Latin portare 'carry'. The verb (from French porter) dates from the mid 16th century.

Phrases

at port arms

Military In the position adopted when given a command to port one’s weapon: the men lined up in full fig, with shields up, helmet masks down, and batons at port arms
More example sentences
  • The naval soldier moved to stand next to the weapons console, rifle held at port arms.
  • For example, a soldier standing at port arms will normally have a center of gravity in the middle of the pelvis, roughly behind the navel.
  • Their faces were concealed by tinted face shields attached to their helmets, and they carried what looked like quarter staffs at port arms.

Definition of port in:

There are 6 definitions of port in English:

port6

Line breaks: port
Pronunciation: /pɔːt
 
/

noun

Australian informal
A suitcase or travelling bag: she packed her ports and walked out
More example sentences
  • And mum cut all those lunches and packed them in your port.
  • And that afternoon my ports were packed, and I hooked on the boat, and our daughter arrived, and away we went.
  • Not only had she succeeded in finding me a sensible port, she had got it for a bargain price, in her home town, and in the presence of our grandmother, The Queen of Shoppers.

Origin

early 20th century: abbreviation of portmanteau.

Definition of port in: