Definition of precept in English:

precept

Line breaks: pre|cept
Pronunciation: /ˈpriːsɛpt
 
/

noun

  • 2A writ or warrant: the Commissioner issued precepts requiring the companies to provide information
    More example sentences
    • ‘I do not think the electorate will wear very large precepts from police authorities any more than they would wear very large precepts from local authorities,’ he said.
  • 3British An order issued by one local authority to another specifying the rate of tax to be charged on its behalf: the precept required a supplementary rate of 6.1p in the pound
  • 3.1A rate or tax set by a precept.
    More example sentences
    • The town council has managed to keep the rise in its council tax precept to the rate of inflation in the next financial year.
    • The executive's budget recommendations will now go to Monday's meeting of the full council, along with the council tax precepts of Lancashire County Council and the Police Authority.
    • All we are suggesting is that the parish councils take over the ones in the villages and that they pay to run them from their council tax precepts.

Derivatives

preceptive

Pronunciation: /prɪˈsɛptɪv/
adjective

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin praeceptum, neuter past participle of praecipere 'warn, instruct', from prae 'before' + capere 'take'.

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a small amount; a little