Definition of predestine in English:

predestine

Line breaks: pre|des¦tine
Pronunciation: /priːˈdɛstɪn
 
/

verb

[with object]
1(Of God) destine (someone) for a particular fate or purpose: Calvinists believed that every person was predestined by God to go to heaven or to hell
More example sentences
  • Although Protestant reformers taught that God had predestined each individual to salvation or damnation, they still expected her to live a godly life, obeying God rather than man.
  • The first act of God to remedy the damage and danger, was to predestine an elect people to be restored to the image of his son.
  • It is through grace, as Augustine explains, not merit, that God predestines his elect.
1.1Determine (an outcome or course of events) in advance by divine will or fate: (as adjective predestined) our predestined end
More example sentences
  • Tenacious resistance was also demonstrated by the remnants of the First Army caught in the jaws of the German trap and knowing that the outcome was predestined.
  • But I know I'm not going to pay any attention to those who tell me that the election result is predestined, even if… make that especially if they tell me what I want to hear.
  • Of course Rhyann had absolutely no clue what exactly what predestined event her grandmother was trying to halt.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French predestiner or ecclesiastical Latin praedestinare (see predestinate).

Definition of predestine in:

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