Definition of prelate in English:

prelate

Line breaks: prel|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈprɛlət
 
/

noun

formal or historical
A bishop or other high ecclesiastical dignitary.
More example sentences
  • But in the 1893 campaign in Chicago, Moody was the first evangelical preacher that I know of who invited Roman Catholic prelates, priests, and bishops to share his platform.
  • The pictures from Saint Peter's Square on an unusually warm and bright day were sharp and colorful, the rows of scarlet-robed prelates encircling the pope's chair a strong visual sign of Catholic solidarity and order.
  • Only the king could appoint people to it and normally only princes of the blood (the most senior nobles), senior prelates and magnates were allowed to join.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French prelat, from medieval Latin praelatus 'civil dignitary', past participle (used as a noun) of Latin praeferre 'carry before', also 'place before in esteem'.

Derivatives

prelatic

Pronunciation: /prɪˈlatɪk/
adjective
More example sentences
  • It is also important to distinguish between a Shepherd's Cross and a bishop's crosier, which is simply a symbol of prelatic authority and jurisdiction.

prelatical

Pronunciation: /prɪˈlatɪk(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • The goal is to lay out these two values-the ‘Miltonian’ and ‘prelatical’ commitments of ECUSA-and then ask if the Covenant is not a clearly effective way of granting these elements a constructive life together.
  • Visiting the great Galileo - in an Inquisition prison - did not destroy Milton's veneration for Italian science and learning but it deepened his hatred of prelatical licensing.

Definition of prelate in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day bogle
Pronunciation: ˈbəʊɡ(ə)l
noun
a phantom or goblin