Definition of presuppose in English:

presuppose

Line breaks: pre|sup¦pose
Pronunciation: /priːsəˈpəʊz
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Require as a precondition of possibility or coherence: their original prediction presupposed a universe only three billion years old
More example sentences
  • But individuality and distinctiveness presuppose coherence and unity: without them, nothing can stand on its own as an object either of admiration or contempt.
  • Nevertheless, our very procedure, in deriving therefrom a lawlike description of the infinite modes, presupposes the possibility of a deductive science.
  • Protest, however, also presupposed the possibility of improving one's condition by exerting pressure.
Synonyms
require, necessitate, imply, entail, mean, involve, assume, suppose, have as a necessary condition, have as a precondition
1.1 [with clause] Tacitly assume at the beginning of a line of argument or course of action that something is the case: your argument presupposes that it does not matter who is in power
More example sentences
  • Such an argument would have to presuppose that there is somehow something wrong with being gay.
  • Such an argument presupposes that the owner operates hands-off.
  • This argument presupposes that rational individuals either cannot, or do not, act in their own best interests.
Synonyms
presume, assume, take it for granted, take it, take it as read/given, suppose, surmise, think, accept, consider, postulate, posit

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French presupposer, suggested by medieval Latin praesupponere, from prae 'before' + supponere 'place under' (see suppose).

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Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict