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previse

Line breaks: pre|vise
Pronunciation: /prɪˈvʌɪz
 
/

Definition of previse in English:

verb

[with object] literary
Foresee or predict (an event): he had intelligence to previse the possible future
More example sentences
  • The future cannot be prevised except in a general way, in an unfinished universe where science must expect to revise its formulations in further research.

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin praevis- 'foreseen, anticipated', from the verb praevidere, from prae 'before' + videre 'to see'.

Derivatives

prevision

1
Pronunciation: /-ˈvɪʒ(ə)n/
noun
Example sentences
  • Unfortunately, for obtaining a prevision of such events, not a penny was spent.
  • Is the appearance of design in organisms (as exhibited in their functional complexity) the result of purely natural forces acting without prevision or teleology?
  • The only fiction which she ever wrote in the first person, it tells of a young man, Latimer, whose dubious gift of prevision causes him repeatedly to relive the moment of his approaching death.

previsional

2
Pronunciation: /-ˈvɪʒ(ə)n(ə)l/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Some scientific investigators consider precognition a branch of clairvoyance and call it previsional clairvoyance.

Definition of previse in:

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Word of the day prepotent
Pronunciation: prɪˈpəʊt(ə)nt
adjective
greater than others in power or influence