Definition of propitiate in English:

propitiate

Line breaks: pro|piti|ate
Pronunciation: /prəˈpɪʃɪeɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

propitiation

noun
More example sentences
  • He submits as the substitute for sinners who cannot possibly atone for their own sins; that is, he submits to the expiation (wiping clean) of that sin and the propitiation (appeasing satisfaction) of God's justified anger.
  • The third… is that of expiation, propitiation and reconciliation… [and] the fourth end, finally, is that of impetration.
  • In the context of hunting, young girls are the appropriate instrument for the propitiation of the goddess and the securing of her favour.

propitiative

adjective rare

propitiator

noun
More example sentences
  • Moreover, they regarded their coalition partners, the Kadets, as essential propitiators of the officer corps.

propitiatory

adjective
More example sentences
  • They must also offer a propitiatory sacrifice to the god worth fifteen drachmae.
  • God's displeasure can only be appeased, then, if a propitiatory sacrifice is made.
  • Sacred places, old dwelling sites, and cemeteries exist, but propitiatory rites are made individually.

Origin

late Middle English (as propitiation): from Latin propitiat- 'made favourable', from the verb propitiare, from propitius 'favourable, gracious' (see propitious).

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