Definition of propulsion in English:

propulsion

Line breaks: pro|pul¦sion
Pronunciation: /prəˈpʌlʃ(ə)n
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
The action of driving or pushing forwards: they dive and use their wings for propulsion under water
More example sentences
  • The propulsion and power systems are controlled from the Machinery Control Room.
  • This kick has more forward propulsion and causes the hips to rise, just like in butterfly.
  • In electric traction, the first inventions for propulsion of vehicles were by battery-stored power.
Synonyms
thrust, motive force, propelling force, impelling force, impetus, impulse, drive, driving force, actuation, push, surge, pressure, momentum, power

Origin

early 17th century (in the sense 'expulsion'): from medieval Latin propulsio(n-), from Latin propellere 'drive before (oneself)'.

Derivatives

propulsive

Pronunciation: /-ˈpʌlsɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • A box-like structure on the propeller shaft, the thrust bearing transfers propulsive force from the propeller shaft to the hull of the ship.
  • The propulsive beat went with the bad roads, wild driving and free-form mix of human and animal passengers.
  • A propulsive charge sends the shell into the air.

propulsively

Pronunciation: /-ˈpʌlsɪvli/
adverb
More example sentences
  • Their samples and scratches burble and skitter propulsively, punctuated by atmospheric electronic effects and little blasts of noise.
  • Paired with these classic honky-tonk ballads are his propulsively arranged guitars; they accompany her songs perfectly and inject a significant pulse of rock 'n' roll.

Definition of propulsion in:

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