Definition of protract in English:

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protract

Pronunciation: /prəˈtrakt/

verb

[with object]
Prolong: he had certainly taken his time, even protracting the process
More example sentences
  • To deprive a successful litigant of interest on his or her legal costs is to encourage the losing side to delay and protract the assessment process.
  • The ‘winner-take-all electoral vote’ practice can avoid prolonged county by county vote count, which will inevitably protract the delivery of a new president.
  • We've been in such a hurry for all these years for one main reason - the more the negotiations are protracted, the more difficult they become, which can be easily noticed.

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin protract- 'prolonged', from the verb protrahere, from pro- 'out' + trahere 'to draw'.

More
  • abstract from Middle English:

    The Latin source of abstract, meant literally ‘drawn away’ and is from abstrahere, from the elements ab- ‘from’ and trahere ‘draw off’. The use in art dates from the mid 19th century. Trahere is found in many English words including: attract (Late Middle English) with ad ‘to’; portrait (mid 16th century), something drawn; protract (mid 16th century) with pro ‘out’; retract (Late Middle English) and retreat (Late Middle English) both drawing back; and words listed at train.

Words that rhyme with protract

abreact, abstract, act, attract, bract, compact, contract, counteract, diffract, enact, exact, extract, fact, humpbacked, impact, interact, matter-of-fact, pact, redact, refract, retroact, subcontract, subtract, tact, tract, transact, unbacked, underact, untracked

For editors and proofreaders

Line breaks: pro|tract

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