Definition of prudential in English:

prudential

Line breaks: pru¦den|tial
Pronunciation: /prʊˈdɛnʃ(ə)l
 
/

adjective

  • Involving or showing care and forethought, especially in business: the US prudential rules prevented banks from lending more than fifteen per cent of their capital to any one borrower
    More example sentences
    • Unfortunately, within the Government's rules, prudential borrowing would not provide the solution to our problems.
    • Even in his first five years of supposedly prudential stewardship, his new regulations cost British business a total of £15.6bn.
    • The performance is creditworthy in view of the absorption of overhang problems by public sector banks and tightening of prudential norms for the banks.

Derivatives

prudentially

adverb
More example sentences
  • But, unless that turns out to be the case, I still think that the strategy has been both prudentially and morally correct in this case.
  • One's attitude to the law in such circumstances has to be entirely instrumental - it has to be reckoned with as a force, and used prudentially, but we cannot afford to rely on such means.
  • Had UMP been prudentially regulated, the company would have funded these liabilities by law.

Origin

late Middle English: from prudent, on the pattern of words such as evidential.

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Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively