Definition of publicist in English:

publicist

Line breaks: pub¦li|cist
Pronunciation: /ˈpʌblɪsɪst
 
/

noun

  • 1A person responsible for publicizing a product, person, or company.
    More example sentences
    • Stephanie is part of a team of publicists, producers, coaches and managers who look after Tabby's frantic schedule, choreograph his songs and generally keep him on the path to fame.
    • His publicists have produced a film showing the veteran politician without the turban, sitting for a haircut, and watching football.
    • All the models are there, all the hair and makeup backstage, all the publicists, all the producers.
  • 2 dated A journalist, especially one concerned with current affairs.
    More example sentences
    • He was the government's publicist, writing pamphlets, verses and periodicals which were instrumental in discrediting the Whigs.
    • He is a tireless publicist who has authored many books, articles, prefaces and pamphlets.
  • 3 archaic A writer or other person skilled in international law.
    More example sentences
    • In addition, the aforementioned provisions of the Versailles Treaty were harshly criticized by some eminent publicists, among them the Italian leading jurist and politician V. E. Orlando.
    • There is not much difference in this respect between the treatises of the early publicists and those of modern writers.
    • Numerous publicists advocated a national celebration before the first anniversary of 1813 and hence between 17 and 19 October 1814, festivities took place in hundreds of cities.

Derivatives

publicistic

Pronunciation: /-ˈsɪstɪk/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Your journalist has not shown even an elementary measure of good publicistic practice or press ethics.
  • Publicistic essays were extremely popular at those times when journalism in European countries reached the point when newspapers finally became periodic.
  • The article itself is not a program of action, and even is not a publicistic work, but a certain political literary performance.

Origin

late 18th century: from French publiciste, from Latin (jus) publicum 'public (law)'.

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