Definition of ranking in English:

ranking

Line breaks: rank|ing
Pronunciation: /ˈraŋkɪŋ
 
/

noun

  • 1A position in a hierarchy or scale: his world number-one ranking
    More example sentences
    • The surveys from other websites at various times may not have the same rankings.
    • Why else would he point to the Macleans rankings which I posted on a few days ago?
    • Victory at the Deutsche Bank championship lifts Singh to number one in the world rankings.
  • 1.1 [mass noun] The action or process of giving a specified rank to someone or something: the ranking of students
    More example sentences
    • In any ranking of political systems over the last hundred years or so Australia would have to be very close to the top.
    • The process of valuation and ranking obviously assumes the work, and implications, of a canon.
    • That community may desire competitive ranking of scholarship rather than benchmarking of quality.

adjective

[in combination] Back to top  
  • 1Having a specified rank in a hierarchy: high-ranking army officers
    More example sentences
    • Millions of visitors are expected to travel to China for the Olympics, including high ranking U. S. officials.
    • There is also sporadic news of high ranking al-Qaeda officials travelling in Iran, seeming to be causally connected to terror attacks in Iraq.
    • Clark remains the highest ranking official to appear in a Canadian gay pride parade.
  • 1.1 [attributive] North American Having a high rank: I’m the ranking officer here
    More example sentences
    • He burst into the room with a frantic look on his face, and found the nearest high ranking officer.
    • Mr. King and the others climbed out of the car and addressed the highest ranking officer.
    • The lower ranking officer retaliates by slapping the foot solider next to him.

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Word of the day milord
Pronunciation: mɪˈlɔːd
noun
used to address an English nobleman