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reave

Line breaks: reave
Pronunciation: /riːv
 
/

Definition of reave in English:

verb (past and past participle reft /rɛft/)

[no object] archaic
1Carry out raids in order to plunder: the strong could reave and steal
More example sentences
  • To slink thro' slaps, an' reave an' steal, At stacks o' pease, or stocks o' kail!
  • As their gods were, so their laws were; Thor the strong could reave and steal.
1.1 [with object] Rob (a person or place) of something by force: reft of a crown, he yet may share the feast
More example sentences
  • In silencing my power, I am reft of half my being!
1.2 [with object] Steal (something).
Example sentences
  • Were you planning to escort me to my chambers, or have all your chivalrous faculties been reft from you?
  • Helen, symbolizing perfect beauty as produced by Greek art, is recalled from Hades and ardently pursued by Faust, but finally reft from him.
  • ‘What thou lov'st well shall not be reft from thee,’ said Pound.

Origin

Old English rēafian, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch roven, German rauben, also to rob.

Derivatives

reaver

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Not in our lands; these are claimed for one and one only, not reavers such as thee!
  • What shall a young reaver do but spend his coins like the snake sips water?
  • The great-handed reaver felt a hot scar tear across his cheeks and the bitter salt-welling of blood whet his lips and nostrils.

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