Definition of recluse in English:

recluse

Line breaks: re|cluse
Pronunciation: /rɪˈkluːs
 
/

noun

adjective

archaic Back to top  
  • Favouring a solitary life.
    More example sentences
    • He was a very secretive sort of individual, a very recluse sort of a person, and didn't have much to do with many of the people of this congregation.
    • In my youth I was living in the capital, so that I was able to study in the Board of Astronomy; subsequently, I was instructed in mathematics by a recluse scholar.

Derivatives

reclusion

Pronunciation: /rɪˈkluːʒ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • His reclusion was so absolute that as recently as 2001 he avoided attending a wedding on the long shot that he might bump into a journalist that he scarcely even knew.
  • In more recent years, Brando's brilliance as an actor was overshadowed by his eccentric reclusion, the turmoil in his family life and financial disputes.
  • For the next five years, Ting plans to live in reclusion and focus on a new breakthrough in his art.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French reclus, past participle of reclure, from Latin recludere 'enclose', from re- 'again' + claudere 'to shut'.

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