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reflate

Line breaks: re|flate
Pronunciation: /riːˈfleɪt
 
/

Definition of reflate in English:

verb

[with object]
Expand the level of output of (an economy) by government stimulus, using either fiscal or monetary policy: Western states pressured Schmidt to reflate the West German economy faster [no object]: countries are often unwilling to reflate on their own
More example sentences
  • This leaves the ‘old school economic policies’ of dollar devaluation and deficit financing to help reflate the economy and fend off deflation and boost exporters.
  • Also, the return to a zero interest rate policy by the Bank of Japan signals its intent to reflate the economy.
  • The big risk for bonds is that the Fed's efforts to reflate the economy will prove all too successful, leading to an eventual surge in inflation.

Origin

1930s: from re- 'again', on the pattern of inflate, deflate.

Derivatives

reflation

1
noun
Example sentences
  • If Japan ultimately does get serious about aggressive monetary reflation, it appears to us that an extremely cheap yen policy is the inevitable by-product.
  • Malaysia turned to capital controls, whilst embarking on an aggressive policy of monetary reflation.
  • Can the recession and the deflationary trend be corrected by massive reflation?

reflationary

2
adjective
Example sentences
  • The editorial repeated calls for a reflationary monetary policy coupled with a fiscal program to rein in government deficits.
  • With interest rate cuts and a reflationary budget, shares in the sector could have further to go, provided the British economy is not dragged down by the problems in the US.
  • And while the stock market wallows in today's reflationary environment, we'll stick with our view that what is unfolding is not favorable for U.S. financial assets generally.

Definition of reflate in:

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