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regal

Line breaks: regal
Pronunciation: /ˈriːɡ(ə)l
 
/

Definition of regal in English:

adjective

Of, resembling, or fit for a monarch, especially in being magnificent or dignified: her regal bearing
More example sentences
  • Considered a symbol of regal authority, the dragon was also thought to dispel evil spirits.
  • The banquet hall was bright and cheerful, full of nobles and lords looking dignified and regal.
  • The show has been designed in such a way as to take audience down the memory lane to a time when the Kilimanoor Palace was at its splendid and regal best.
Synonyms
majestic, fit for a king/queen/prince/princess, grand, impressive, imposing, splendid, superb, magnificent, noble, proud, stately, dignified, exalted, glorious, striking, spectacular, awe-inspiring, breathtaking, sumptuous, opulent, fine, luxurious, deluxe, lavish, resplendent, monumental, palatial, august, distinguished, great
informal splendiferous, ritzy, posh
royal, kingly, queenly, princely, sovereign, crowned

noun

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A small portable reed organ of the 16th and 17th centuries, with a pair of horizontal bellows on top.
Example sentences
  • Small portable organs consisting entirely of regals were widely used in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin regalis, from rex, reg- 'king'.

More
  • regency from (Late Middle English):

    Between 1811 and 1820 George, Prince of Wales was regent (Late Middle English) for his father King George III, who was suffering from a long-term mental illness. The prince was known for his fun-loving lifestyle and support for the arts, and the period of the Regency was noted for its distinctive fashions and architecture—such as, for example, the wildly exotic Brighton Pavilion designed by John Nash. The balls and parties held by the aristocracy of the time are imagined in the romantic historical novels set in this period and called Regency romances. The source of regency is Latin regere ‘to govern, rule’, which means it is related to words like regal (Late Middle English) ‘like a ruler’; rector (Late Middle English) ‘governor’( see vicar); regime (Late Middle English) ‘rule or regulation’; regiment (Late Middle English) which originally had the same sense as regime; region (Middle English) an area governed; regular (Late Middle English) originally ‘governed by a rule’; royal; and rule.

Derivatives

regally

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • As the final ball landed, she stood stunned on the baseline and then walked slowly and regally to congratulate Henin-Hardenne, embracing her and offering many words of praise.
  • We could happily have pottered about the site for most of our four-day break, swimming, playing footie and watching the yachts float regally by.
  • She was driven through the city, waving regally at her subjects who thronged the parched sidewalks on that hot summer's day.

Words that rhyme with regal

beagle, eagle, illegal, legal, paralegal, spread eagle, viceregal

Definition of regal in:

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