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relatable

Line breaks: re|lat¦able
Pronunciation: /rɪˈleɪtəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of relatable in English:

adjective

1Able to be related to something else: the growth of the welfare state will be clearly relatable to the growth of democracy
More example sentences
  • In each of these cases, the ethics are relatable to the processes whereby decisions are made.
  • It has played a very strong part in my being born again with its easily relatable themes of ambition versus obligation.
  • Although its influence on the behavior modification procedures relatable to operant formulations has been negligible, Skinner has attempted to define the term.
2Enabling a person to feel that they can relate to someone or something: Mary-Kate’s problems make her more relatable
More example sentences
  • Like many later Oliver Stone films, there simply isn't a relatable character in the bunch.
  • Now, Monica said, Mary-Kate's problems make her more relatable.
  • The directors always seem to confuse making something relatable with making something cool.

Derivatives

relatability

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The magazine enters the reality realm of finance with a dash of humour and relatability.
  • If there's something new about today's zombie, it's his relatability.
  • How we, you know, grow that fan base is the relatability and the realness of the subject matter.

Definition of relatable in:

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Pronunciation: ɪnˈɡreɪʃɪeɪt
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