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remedial

Line breaks: re|med¦ial
Pronunciation: /rɪˈmiːdɪəl
 
/

Definition of remedial in English:

adjective

1Giving or intended as a remedy or cure: remedial surgery
More example sentences
  • Although the evidence is limited, these patients are often treated with warfarin to prevent progression, especially if remedial surgery is not possible.
  • Not all patients would benefit from remedial massage, but once they are re-aligned, it is the icing on the cake to go in deep and work on muscles that may have been held in spasm for many years.
  • Geriatricians are concerned about standards of assessment and continuing medical, nursing, and remedial therapy care in nursing homes.
1.1Provided or intended for children with learning difficulties: remedial education
More example sentences
  • To many, adult education is nothing but literacy and remedial education aiming at teaching people how to read and write.
  • Instead, it is considered just a condition requiring remedial education.
  • Early identification and intervention is much easier than remedial education in late years.

Origin

mid 17th century: from late Latin remedialis, from Latin remedium 'cure, medicine' (see remedy).

Derivatives

remedially

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • Having virtually no THC levels, it isn't used remedially but rather grown for the hemp fibre (thus distinguishing the two apart from each other).
  • They also use the herb remedially at low doses to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Thus, the initial hopes and expectations for remedially oriented special education often go unmet.

Definition of remedial in:

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