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reportorial

Line breaks: rep¦or|tor¦ial
Pronunciation: /ˌrɛpɔːˈtɔːrɪəl
 
/

Definition of reportorial in English:

adjective

North American
Of or characteristic of newspaper reporters: reportorial ambition and curiosity
More example sentences
  • In the reportorial images, evocative views from the ongoing series ‘Chasing Shadows’, Mofokeng reveres the arcane spirit of syncretic Easter Sunday rituals performed at the cave of Motouleng, a Free State mountain regarded as holy.
  • In that early poem, ‘The Egyptian Passage,’ for example-which is reportorial, without losing any compression of the language, and seems to be about all of the world, including the horror, by implication.
  • What Joseph Mitchell achieved in his New Yorker profiles of Bowery ticket-takers, Staten Island oystermen and Mohawk skyscraper steelworkers, Kuralt approached, more fondly, in his reportorial visits.

Origin

mid 19th century: from reporter, on the pattern of editorial.

Derivatives

reportorially

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • In his introduction, Boynton defines the ‘new new journalism’ as ‘reportorially based, narrative-driven long-form nonfiction’ and lauds it as representing ‘the continued maturation of American literary journalism.’
  • It nails down the wry, wisecracking tone of the business world in lively, almost reportorially vivid detail.
  • Both reportorially and philosophically, Gitlin helps the reader understand once-familiar political strategies like "sit-in" and "teach-in."

Definition of reportorial in:

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