There are 2 main definitions of reproof in English:

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reproof 1

Line breaks: re|proof
Pronunciation: /rɪˈpruːf/

noun

An expression of blame or disapproval: she welcomed him with a mild reproof for leaving her alone [mass noun]: a look of reproof
More example sentences
  • It could signify a promise or a threat or a reproof.
  • A statue showing Medea about to slaughter her children symbolizes the reproof of infanticide. In this case, death is clearly shown as a contained force, even a holy force.
  • By the faintly chagrined expression on his face, Darius could very safely assume that Asgard had received a similar reproof.
Synonyms
informal telling-off, rap over the knuckles, slap on the wrist, dressing down, blast
British informal ticking off, wigging
Australian/New Zealand informal serve
British vulgar slang bollocking
dated rating

Origin

Middle English: from Old French reprove, from reprover 'reprove'. Early senses included 'ignominy, personal shame' and 'scorn'.

Definition of reproof in:

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There are 2 main definitions of reproof in English:

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reproof 2 Line breaks: re|proof
Pronunciation: /riːˈpruːf/

verb

[with object]
1British Make (a garment) waterproof again.
Example sentences
  • The responses of writers and scholars to his work have varied, journalists tending towards praise and even adulation, academic linguists towards caution and even reproof.
  • Despite their spotty record, the military foundations and other army-connected companies are generally above reproof.
  • Nonetheless, the military foundations and other army-connected companies are above reproof.
2Make a fresh proof of (printed matter).
Example sentences
  • The main text needs to be reproofed, for example, ‘[a] nd when they made a motion, that called out loudly’ should be ‘they called out loudly.’

Definition of reproof in:

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Word of the day innocuous
Pronunciation: ɪˈnɒkjʊəs
adjective
not harmful or offensive