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revenue

Line breaks: rev|enue
Pronunciation: /ˈrɛvənjuː
 
/

Definition of revenue in English:

noun

[mass noun] (also revenues)
1Income, especially when of an organization and of a substantial nature: traders have lost £10,000 in revenue since the traffic scheme was implemented
More example sentences
  • It would allow De Cairos to keep control of the company and at the same time would allow it to raise substantial revenues.
  • It is assumed that teams set ticket prices to maximize revenues for the organization.
  • The slump in advertising revenue in all media organisations continues to hamper the station.
Synonyms
1.1A state’s annual income from which public expenses are met: his priority was to raise government revenue and to lower expenditure the government’s tax revenues
More example sentences
  • If tax revenue goes down then public services have to have less money.
  • The golden rule means that tax revenues should pay for public spending, so the chancellor should only borrow money to invest.
  • As the stock market soared, it brought state personal income tax revenue up with it.
1.2 (often the revenue) The department of the civil service collecting state revenue: when the revenue makes a demand for tax, that demand is implicitly backed by the powers of the state See also inland revenue.
More example sentences
  • Under the Roman empire the system of collecting, the revenue put extreme pressure on the poor.
  • And if as a result of the new patents, the revenue gets a five million leva boost, who cares?
  • Where more than one residence is involved, you must decide which property is the PPR and tell the revenue.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French revenu(e) 'returned', past participle (used as a noun) of revenir, from Latin revenire 'return', from re- 'back' + venire 'come'.

More
  • The word revenue is from Old French revenu(e) meaning ‘returned’, from Latin revenire ‘return’, from re- ‘back’ and venire ‘come’. An obsolete and rare use was ‘return to a place’; it was more commonly ‘yield from lands and property’, what would today be called a return on your investment. Venue (late 16th century) is an obvious relative. It was first used as a term for ‘an attack or ‘a thrust’ in fencing and as a legal term meaning ‘the county or district within which a criminal or civil case must be heard’. The sense of a place for entertainment only dates from the 1960s. Avenue (early 17th century) which at first meant ‘way of approaching a problem’ is another relative. It then developed a mainly military sense of a way to access a place, and from that a formal approach to a country house. Only in the middle of the 19th century did it become a term for a wide street.

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