Definition of reverend in English:

reverend

Line breaks: rev|er¦end
Pronunciation: /ˈrɛv(ə)r(ə)nd
 
/

adjective

  • Used as a title or form of address to members of the clergy: the Reverend Pat Tilly
    More example sentences
    • I can almost hear many a reverend pastor's groaning response.
    • The reverend Nicolas Morgan, vicar of St George's Church in Lower Brailes, paid tribute to the hard work of villagers.
    • Since moving to Jerry Falwell's home turf in Lynchburg, Va., in September, openly gay reverend Mel White and his partner, Gary Nixon, are the social butterflies of the neighborhood.

noun

informal Back to top  
  • A clergyman: a retired reverend
    More example sentences
    • My appeal to all pastors, bishops, reverends and other church leaders, is that they should not sell their birthright to any organisation for the sake of money.
    • All the thousands of priests, reverends, parsons, ministers, etc. that make a living from talking about their god, claim that giving money to them will ‘help’ their god.
    • Academics from US Ivy League universities have written to protest, along with rabbis, pastors, reverends and mullahs as well as the International Young Christian Workers' movement.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin reverendus 'person to be revered', gerundive of revereri (see revere).

Usage

As a title Reverend is used for members of the clergy; the traditionally correct form of address is the Reverend James Smith or the Reverend J. Smith , rather than Reverend Smith or simply Reverend . Other words are prefixed in titles of more senior clergy: bishops are Right Reverend, archbishops are Most Reverend, and deans are Very Reverend.

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