Definition of rigmarole in English:

rigmarole

Line breaks: rig¦mar|ole
Pronunciation: /ˈrɪɡmərəʊl
 
/

noun

1A lengthy and complicated procedure: he went through the rigmarole of securing the front door
More example sentences
  • We ought to learn business like everybody else, go through the same rigmarole.
  • But then came the page banners and pop-up ads and the whole rigmarole started all over again.
  • They are for people who know what they want and who don't want to go through the rigmarole of talking to a sales assistant.
Synonyms
lengthy process, fuss, fuss and bother, bother, commotion, trouble, folderol, ado, pother
New Zealand informal bobsy-die
1.1A long, rambling story or statement: she went into a long rigmarole about the different jobs she’d had
More example sentences
  • So aleatoric poetry could be described with historical exactitude as a rigmarole.
  • The book is packed with stimulating philosophical (and depressingly prophetic) allusion within the author's own field, but ends up as a bit of a rigmarole.
  • The others were standing around, drinks in hand, congratulating my cousin on his initiation, and asking us amused tones what we thought of the crazy rigmarole.
Synonyms
lengthy story/explanation, saga, yarn, recitation, burble, burbling, maundering, shaggy-dog story
informal spiel, banging on, palaver

Origin

mid 18th century: apparently an alteration of ragman roll, originally denoting a legal document recording a list of offences.

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Word of the day bimble
Pronunciation: ˈbɪmb(ə)l
verb
walk or travel at a leisurely pace