Share this entry

Share this page

ring-in

Line breaks: ring-in

Definition of ring-in in English:

noun

Australian /NZ
1A horse or an athlete fraudulently substituted for another in a competition or event: a horse that had been racing as a ring-in
More example sentences
  • Like every racecourse, there were fixers, riggers, ring-ins, commentators, punters, triers, chancers, long-shots, favourites, colourful racing identities, union bosses and plenty of crooks.
  • You'd get ring-ins like grade players and boxers.
1.1A person or thing that is not a genuine member of a group or set: are you a fair dinkum pom or a ring-in?
More example sentences
  • Conscious that I was possibly a ring-in, an inauthentic reader, not ‘general’ enough, the question of audience kept niggling at the back of my mind as I read McClanahan's guide.
  • What I wasn't aware of was that he was also a first gamer playing as a ring-in, and he had no idea who he was supposed to be.
  • It looked the business anyway - you'd have no idea it had been thrown together over a frenetic weekend by a bunch of enthusiasts and ring-ins.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day resilient
Pronunciation: rɪˈzɪlɪənt
adjective
able to recoil or spring back into shape…