Definition of roaring in English:

roaring

Line breaks: roar|ing
Pronunciation: /ˈrɔːrɪŋ
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
  • 1Making or uttering a roar: he was greeted everywhere with roaring crowds a swollen, roaring river
    More example sentences
    • In his film pieces, he often made use of commercial production techniques or isolated bits of Hollywood films, as when he created a continuous loop of the roaring MGM lion.
    • The colors of the jerseys, contrasting with the sheen of the ice and the roaring crowd, is striking and brilliant.
    • With the roaring crowd approving of the result, the owner eagerly signs the band to a regular gig.
  • 1.1(Of a fire) burning fiercely and noisily: he sat by the roaring fire
    More example sentences
    • Tis the season to be jolly - to sip hot chocolate and open presents in front of a roaring fire.
    • Almost everyone loves to cozy up to a roaring fire.
    • Similar to those old loops local TV stations used to run when they went off the air for the holidays, you too can have your very own roaring holiday fire to impress your family and friends.
    Synonyms
  • 1.2chiefly • archaic Behaving or living in a noisy riotous manner: a roaring boy
  • 1.3(Of a period of time) characterized by prosperity, optimism, and excitement: the Roaring Twenties
    More example sentences
    • We see destitute postwar Germany in the roaring 1920s.
    • The cruise ships reached their heyday during the roaring '20s, and then slowly began declining.
    • From the roaring 20's to the beaches of Normandy, it has always had a certain panache.
  • 2 informal Very obviously or unequivocally the thing mentioned (used for emphasis): last week’s 70s night was a roaring success [as submodifier]: two roaring drunk firemen
    More example sentences
    • To show us that success is ‘hollow,’ we see hollow Patrick a roaring success at 27, a vice president at a major Wall Street firm with a six-figure salary.
    • Based on these criteria, I must judge my experience as a panelist for the film festival group's annual list of notable Canadian films a roaring success.
    • The character of Dash is clearly intended to give young boys an entry point into the film and he is a roaring success, with older sister Violet filling the same part for the female crowd.
    Synonyms
    enormous, huge, massive, (very) great, tremendous, terrific; complete, unqualified, out-and-out, thorough, unmitigated
    informal rip-roaring, whopping, thumping, fantastic

Phrases

do a roaring trade (or business)

informal Do very good business: the cafes on the boulevard were doing a roaring trade the food sellers were doing a roaring trade in spiced sausages
More example sentences
  • All the businesses in Crosshaven are doing a roaring trade.
  • All the usual entertainments - roundabouts and other such things - were there to entice children, and they seemed to be doing a roaring trade.
  • The army of car washers do a roaring trade in cleaning the interiors too, with many people are happy to leave their car unlocked for them while they go shopping.

the roaring forties

Stormy ocean tracts between latitudes 40° and 50° south.
More example sentences
  • First we get to a beach, Ocean's beach, where the roaring forties waves reach land.
  • Weather has been at the forefront of the news, with once in a couple of lifetime floods and winds to make the roaring forties seem tame.
  • Australia is a big country, stretching from the tropics to the roaring forties, and it has a correspondingly wide range of climates.

Derivatives

roaringly

adverb
More example sentences
  • After having a roaringly good time hanging out with the ‘Chattopadhyay girls’, we had all-night singing sessions.
  • He had a habit of getting roaringly drunk and shouting Hamlet out of his bedroom window.
  • It starts out roaringly funny, then turns into something deeply dark.

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