There are 2 definitions of rook in English:

rook1

Line breaks: rook
Pronunciation: /rʊk
 
/

noun

A gregarious Eurasian crow with black plumage and a bare face, nesting in colonies in treetops.
  • Corvus frugilegus, family Corvidae
More example sentences
  • Birds - blackbirds and thrushes, robins, starlings, rooks and crows, jays, ducks, seagulls and owls will eat slugs.
  • Crows belong to the family of corvids, which also includes rooks, jays, ravens and jackdaws.
  • Outside the city walls, the fields would have supported birds such as starlings, rooks and crows, just as you can see today but in greater abundance.

verb

[with object] informal Back to top  
Defraud, overcharge, or swindle (someone): police files are overflowing with complaints from people who’ve been rooked that lawyer rooked me out of it
More example sentences
  • And they were convinced they'd rooked us… Yeah, the perfect business deal.
  • He once said: ‘If we were to apply the Sermon on the Mount to our business, we would be rooked within six months.’
  • I started to notice that I was getting rooked by the sites about a year ago.

Origin

Old English hrōc, probably imitative and of Germanic origin; related to Dutch roek.

Definition of rook in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day antebellum
Pronunciation: ˌantɪˈbɛləm
adjective
occurring or existing before a particular war…

There are 2 definitions of rook in English:

rook2

Line breaks: rook
Pronunciation: /rʊk
 
/

noun

A chess piece, typically with its top in the shape of a battlement, that can move in any direction along a rank or file on which it stands. Each player starts the game with two rooks at opposite ends of the first rank. See also castle.
More example sentences
  • With the rise in use of exchange sacrifices, rook versus minor piece endgames are becoming more common, and there are key defensive techniques that a player must know.
  • In the even rarer case of two rooks vs. three minor pieces, the limited statistics give the minor pieces a slight edge provided they include the bishop pair, which they usually do.
  • All the pieces move in straight lines like the rook or castle in chess, and a piece may be moved any number of squares providing no other piece is standing in the way.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French rock, based on Arabic ruḵḵ (of which the sense remains uncertain).

Definition of rook in: