Definition of rouse in English:

rouse

Line breaks: rouse
Pronunciation: /raʊz
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Cause to stop sleeping: she was roused from a deep sleep by a hand on her shoulder
    More example sentences
    • Joe was roused from his sleep by Azara promptly jumping on the bed and pulling on his arm.
    • The morning's first rays of sunlight flooded the tiny tower room, rousing Callista from her sleep.
    • On the other side of him, men, women, and children were rousing themselves from sleep and moving sluggishly to the fire to get warm.
    Synonyms
    wake, wake up, awaken, waken, arouse; call, get up
    informal give someone a shout, knock up
  • 1.1 [no object] Cease to sleep or to be inactive; wake up: she roused, took off her eyepads, and looked around
    More example sentences
    • As he slowly stood up, Jeremy roused from his sleep.
    • Isabella roused from sleep what seemed like an eternity later, disturbed by something she could not identify.
    • He still hadn't roused from his sleep, and she was getting worried.
    Synonyms
    wake up, wake, awaken, come to, get up, get out of bed, rise, bestir oneself
    formal arise
  • 1.2Bring out of inactivity: once the enemy camp was roused, they would move on the castle she’d just stay a few more minutes, then rouse herself and go back
    More example sentences
    • The racket was tremendous, and eventually caused Mara to rouse himself from study and look over the rails just as a fifty-foot high pillar roared past and set the sky alight with Imperial flame.
    • Any ruler who wishes to attain his noblest ends must rouse himself to follow the dictates of virtue in all his public acts.
    • Kara tried unsuccessfully to rouse herself from her stupor.
  • 1.3Startle (game) from a lair or cover.
  • 3Stir (a liquid, especially beer while brewing): rouse the beer as the hops are introduced

Derivatives

rousable

adjective

rouser

noun
More example sentences
  • Thankfully, the lack of umpires and a couple of notorious rousers kept some traditions intact.
  • The show ended not with a hit, or a populist rouser, but two new Springsteen classic songs.
  • The event was a history-making rouser but proved to be virtually a one-night stand, since the unit folded within weeks.

Origin

late Middle English (originally as a hawking and hunting term): probably from Anglo-Norman French, of unknown ultimate origin.

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