There are 3 definitions of row in English:

row1

Line breaks: row
Pronunciation: /rəʊ
 
/

noun

  • 1A number of people or things in a more or less straight line: her villa stood in a row of similar ones
    More example sentences
    • There were peas, and beans, and rows of young turnips, and carrots, and parsnips, all bordered by long straight rows of wheat.
    • Tobias grinned again, exposing two rows of straight white teeth.
    • Family photos cover one of the walls, straight rows of memories that seem to blend into one another.
    Synonyms
    line, column, file, cordon; queue; procession, chain, string, series, succession
    informal crocodile
  • 1.1A line of seats in a theatre: they sat in the front row
    More example sentences
    • Devon, Joannah, and Layla found a seat in the row before the last of the full theatre.
    • Within a week of the wedding, he was back at the theater, ensconced in his customary aisle seat in the third row.
    • Not one to miss the opportunity, he grabbed honours by occupying a seat in the first row.
    Synonyms
    tier, line, rank, bank
  • 1.2 [often in place names] A street with a continuous line of houses along one or both of its sides: he lives at 23 Saville Row
    More example sentences
    • Ever since the blast rocked four houses in the middle of a terraced row in Cecilia Street, Great Lever, two years ago, piles of rubble have remained to mark the spot.
    • Yesterday was the last day of the holidays for children in homes along the busy row on the Collie Road, minutes from Clonmel town.
    • Amazingly, the garden has grown to be more than 60 ft-long and has crept around the side of the terraced row.
  • 1.3A horizontal line of entries in a table: visualize the subject in the form of a sheet of paper divided into columns and rows
    More example sentences
    • I had lines and lines of code defining table cells and rows.
    • The first two rows of Table 1 present descriptive information on this first set of indexes for the population.
    • The entries in the rows of Tables III and IV include all reported instruments that were used by multiple schools.
  • 1.4A complete line of stitches in knitting or crochet.
    More example sentences
    • Instead of starting with 38 stitches for the cuffs, I cast on 46 and increased 2 stitches every 6 rows.
    • Dawn was stitching the last row when Tobit barged in, followed by Will.
    • To quilt the sashing and borders, set the machine for a serpentine stitch and stitch parallel rows down the strips.

Phrases

a hard (or tough) row to hoe

A difficult task: the team have a hard row to hoe to get back to the top
More example sentences
  • I'm beginning to get the feeling that if we had control freak parents we have a tough row to hoe when relating to others and particularly our own children.
  • With a kid, there are always so many little GI Joe army boots and stray Lego pieces and art projects lying around, it's a tough row to hoe to keep things tidy.
  • When my older brother went off to college and had to manage without her cooking, it was a tough row to hoe for him.

in a row

Forming a line: four chairs were set in a row
More example sentences
  • More than 20 panels are hung in a row around the gallery like segments of a long comic strip.
  • The only people living in a row of abandoned houses marked for redevelopment have told of their living nightmare.
  • Set them up in a row with about a body width between.
informal In succession: he jumped nineteen clear rounds in a row
More example sentences
  • Murphy has contested the last six tournaments in a row and has no intention of stopping now.
  • If they work six days in a row, they are also legally entitled to a weekly rest period of 45 hours.
  • The team won the game on Tuesday, which made that their seventh straight win in a row.
Synonyms

Row Z

British informal The back row of seats in a concert hall, theatre, or stadium: they could have snatched a late winner, but he struck his shot into row Z
More example sentences
  • Heintze is forced to hack the ball into Row Z.
  • Now, I'm clearly in Row Z - my visitor count makes Robert Smith's election result look good.
  • Neville finds Sullivan on the edge of the field, and Brown rushes out to clear it into Row Z.

Origin

Old English rāw, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch rij and German Reihe.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 3 definitions of row in English:

row2

Line breaks: row
Pronunciation: /rəʊ
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Propel (a boat) with oars: out in the bay a small figure was rowing a rubber dinghy
    More example sentences
    • A girl rows a raft made from banana-tree shoots in the flooded Samata, 35 km east of Guwahati, on Thursday.
    • The Turkish galleys were rowed by slaves: some of the Christian ships were rowed by volunteers.
    • The ferryman dies and Siddhartha is left to row the ferry himself.
  • 1.1 [no object, with adverbial of direction] Travel by rowing a boat: we rowed down the river all day
    More example sentences
    • You used to row out to your boat moored away from the shore.
    • Mr Butler rowed single-handed across the Atlantic in 2001.
    • Campus staff occasionally rowed out to the lake centre in a wooden boat to spread fish food more evenly onto the lake surface.
  • 1.2Convey (a passenger) in a boat by rowing it: her father was rowing her across the lake
    More example sentences
    • The lack of port was a problem for the little township - supplies and passengers had to be rowed by boat through the rolling surf - often struggling wet and miserable to shore.
    • On his retirement in 1992, CDRE McKay was rowed across the lake in a Navy dinghy.
    • The town council has in turn appealed to the seamanship of the Wootton Bassett Sea Cadets who have agreed to launch one of their boats to row the raiding party across.
  • 1.3 [no object] Engage in the sport of rowing, especially competitively: he rowed for England [with complement]: he rowed stroke in the University Eight
    More example sentences
    • He was a fit man, apart from fairly well controlled hypertension, who had been rowing competitively until his 70th birthday, and he rarely visited his general practitioner.
    • He will be rowing with Matthew Pinsent in the coxless pairs.
    • He was also involved in rowing for many years and had few equals in that sport especially when he rowed in the Bluebird in the late sixties and early seventies.

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
  • A spell of rowing.
    More example sentences
    • The two friends had gone for a light row and were turning the double scull boat opposite the boat slip at the Rowing Club when Kieran became suddenly ill.
    • In the women's senior coxed fours, the girls from the school gave a good account of themselves with a well-drilled row to beat Whitby Friendship Rowing Club easily.
    • I got up at 6 and went for a row.

Phrasal verbs

row back

Reverse an earlier decision or previously held opinion; backtrack: he rowed back on his comments the following day if the government attempts to row back from its commitments, disaster will result
More example sentences
  • Yesterday he seemed to be rowing back from his previous night's attacks on capitalist greed.
  • There can be no rowing back on that commitment.
  • The company has now completed the U-turn in its strategy which has seen it rowing back from its grand plans to become a multinational multi-utility.

row someone down

Overtake a team in a rowing race, especially a bumping race.
More example sentences
  • We had confidence in our abilities from our race against Leander in which we had rowed them down round the bigger Surrey bend.
  • Again the same tactic of constant rhythm was employed and we eventually rowed them down.
  • With three minutes to go, and the race still in contention, it was a flashback to this time last year when Oxford rowed Cambridge down around the outside of the last bend.

row someone out

Exhaust someone by rowing: both pairs finished in a distressed condition, Boardman being completely rowed out

row over

Complete the course of a boat race with little effort, owing to the absence or inferiority of competitors.
More example sentences
  • The women's junior 15 coxed quad also rowed over the course without competition.
  • Because they were late Waterford A went out and rowed over the course; this is normal when a crew is late or does not arrive at the Regatta start on time.

Derivatives

rower

noun
More example sentences
  • College rowers out there with aspirations should really put themselves forward and not be afraid to have a go.
  • One 62-year-old rower was transferred to hospital for treatment for severe hypothermia, while 12 rowers were in a state of shock and distress and were warmed up in various rowing clubs.
  • Oxford's rowers pulled off another stunning performance at the Great Britain trials at Hazewinkel in Belgium this month.

Origin

Old English rōwan, of Germanic origin; related to rudder; from an Indo-European root shared by Latin remus 'oar', Greek eretmon 'oar'.

More definitions of row

Definition of row in:

There are 3 definitions of row in English:

row3

Line breaks: row
Pronunciation: /raʊ
 
/

noun

chiefly British

verb

[no object] Back to top  

Phrases

make (or kick up) a row

informal , chiefly British
Make a noise or commotion: people who lived near where they met used to complain about the row they made
More example sentences
  • Later we were most of us very drunk and we went together to the Haymarket Theatre where we kicked up a row.
  • The motor made such a row that it became incredibly embarrassing.
Make a vigorous protest: I was quite comfortable—I kicked up a row out of sheer boredom
More example sentences
  • An encore of a singer being refused, the audience made a row, refused to hear the singers still on the programme, and just went away.
  • Well, I made such a row that the hotel manager did find me a quiet, air conditioned, back-of-the-hotel, fourth floor room for the last two nights of the conference.

Origin

mid 18th century: of unknown origin.

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