Definition of rubble in English:

rubble

Line breaks: rub¦ble
Pronunciation: /ˈrʌb(ə)l
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1Waste or rough fragments of stone, brick, concrete, etc., especially as the debris from the demolition of buildings: two buildings collapsed, trapping scores of people in the rubble
More example sentences
  • These old photographs show York's former garden suburb reduced to rubble following the demolition of condemned houses in the early 1960s.
  • But yesterday at 12 noon Vernon House was reduced to rubble by demolition experts.
  • In January, an order was served on the company demanding that rubbish, rubble and waste was cleared from the land.
Synonyms
debris, remains, ruins, wreckage; broken bricks
1.1Pieces of rough or undressed stone used in building walls, especially as filling for cavities: the tower is built of stone rubble faced with ashlar
More example sentences
  • The external plaster was replaced with a lime-based plaster to allow the stone rubble walls to breathe.
  • It is built of rubble stone with ashlar dressings on a granite plinth.
  • As was often the case in those days, structural perimeter walls are in coursed rubble.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps from an Anglo-Norman French alteration of Old French robe 'spoils'; compare with rubbish.

Derivatives

rubbly

adjective
More example sentences
  • The ending is a blaze of light and sirens and press reporters and a standing ovation when I walk out of what could have been rubbly grave.
  • A hundred thousand people had been assembled in East Berlin to hear him, on a rubbly wasteland off the Friedrichstrasse.
  • It took me a couple of hours, crunching down a steep rubbly track with a panorama of mountains ahead no matter which way the path twisted.

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Pronunciation: əbˈdʒʊə
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solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)