Definition of rubric in English:

rubric

Line breaks: ru¦bric
Pronunciation: /ˈruːbrɪk
 
/

noun

  • 1A heading on a document.
    More example sentences
    • Ten chapters, each laid out under the rubric of a song title, map out some of the main concerns of popular music studies in a textbook format.
    • It was perhaps the first and the bitterest indictment of the press's irresistible tendency to trade in human suffering under the rubric of ‘human interest’.
    • The discussions were organised under the rubric of four broad themes: economic production, access to wealth, civil society and the public arena, and, political power and ethics.
  • 1.1A category: party policies on matters falling under the rubric of law and order
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    • This is different than, say, any of us choosing to include a list of sites we regularly visit, rubrics or categories we embrace.
    • The photographs in the archive can be categorized under three major rubrics: objects, portraits, and landscapes.
    • I answer this quandary by suggesting that we exist under two different constitutions - one for peace and another for war; and whatever exercise of power that cannot be justified under one rubric can be under the other.
  • 2A set of instructions or rules.
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    • Be careful to read through the rubric, the instructions on the examination paper.
    • In some circumstances, it is possible to switch to a project-oriented curriculum with a clear rubric rather than a homework/test-based curriculum.
    • I am uncomfortable with applying these rubrics in a wholesale fashion to the work of honours students.
  • 2.1A direction in a liturgical book as to how a church service should be conducted.
    More example sentences
    • Pope Benedict XVI is an expert on liturgy and the rubrics of liturgical celebration.
    • Fr Robert said he was totally taken with Mass, the centuries of tradition behind it, the liturgy, the rubrics, the rituals and he decided to become a Catholic.
    • Archbishop Parker's Advertisements, issued in response to disputes over clerical dress and ceremonies, enforced the rubrics of the Prayer Book.
  • 2.2A statement of purpose or function: art for a purpose, not for its own sake, was his rubric
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    • Religion as an academic discipline and campus ethos was, in general, the guiding rubric; that left out, for example, religious rituals and practices.
    • The standard rubric is that critics care about literary quality, not commercial success.

Derivatives

rubrical

adjective
More example sentences
  • I have grouped the readings together into five types of evidence: allegorical, liturgical, rubrical, and canonical, ancillary liturgical, scriptural, and historical and catechetical.
  • The rubrical indications of the entrance rite make clear that this is to be seen primarily as a musical part of the rite.

Origin

late Middle English rubrish (originally referring to a heading, section of text, etc. written in red for distinctiveness), from Old French rubriche, from Latin rubrica (terra) 'red (earth or ochre as writing material)', from the base of rubeus 'red'; the later spelling is influenced by the Latin form.

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