Definition of rusk in English:

rusk

Line breaks: rusk
Pronunciation: /rʌsk
 
/

noun

chiefly British
1A light, dry biscuit or piece of twice-baked bread, especially one prepared for use as baby food.
More example sentences
  • Consequently, the first foods to pass Oscar's lips (when they didn't stick to his face, hair and fingers) were not baby rice, rusks and gloop out of a jar.
  • Wheat-based foods which contain gluten, for example, breakfast cereals, wheat flour or rusks.
  • When she started weaning Cameron on to ‘mushy’ food such as wheat-based rusks, his health deteriorated further - and it wasn't just eczema any more.
1.1 [mass noun] Twice-baked bread used in foods such as sausages, and formerly as rations at sea.
More example sentences
  • Sausages have traditionally been regarded as anathema to slimmers because they often include a lot of bread and rusk.
  • If I were a perfectionist I'd say they are still a tad lean, so we added a bit more fat for the second batch, which used oatmeal for rusk instead of breadcrumbs, and included a load of sage and thyme from the garden.
  • Similarly, those healthier lower-fat pork sausages are probably padded out with wheat rusk.

Origin

late 16th century: from Spanish or Portuguese rosca 'twist, coil, roll of bread', of unknown ultimate origin.

Definition of rusk in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day dinkum
Pronunciation: ˈdɪŋkəm
adjective
(of an article or person) genuine, honest, true