There are 2 definitions of sake in English:

sake1

Line breaks: sake
Pronunciation: /seɪk
 
/

noun

  • 1 (for the sake of something or for something's sake) For the purpose of; in the interest of; in order to achieve or preserve: the couple moved to the coast for the sake of her health let us say, for the sake of argument, that the plotter and the assassin are one and the same person
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    • It is our hope that the president will make a wise decision for the sake of national interests.
    • At least certain parts of the city need to be preserved for the sake of posterity.
    • Realistically, however, a line must be drawn under the amendments at some point for the sake of achieving the deal.
    Synonyms
    cause, purpose, reason, aim, end, objective, object, goal, motive; for purposes of, for, in the interests of, in the cause of, in the furtherance of, in order to achieve, with something in mind
  • 1.1 (for its own sake or something for something's sake or for the sake of it) Used to indicate something that is done as an end in itself rather than to achieve some other purpose: new ideas amount to change for change’s sake
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    • In their view art education should be championed for its own sake, not because of a wishful sentiment that classes in painting, dance and music improve pupils' math and reading skills and standardized test scores.
    • But education for its own sake is a bit dodgy, too. The idea that you can learn about the world sitting in your study just reading books is not quite right.
  • 2 (for the sake of someone or for someone's sake) Out of consideration for or in order to help or please someone: I have to make an effort for John’s sake
    More example sentences
    • But she made an effort to smile, for Dave 's sake.
    • He'd find it funny, or at least make an effort and smile for my sake.
    • Pupils already spend a limited time at school, and, therefore, teachers should never consider striking for their sake.
    Synonyms
    benefit, advantage, good, well-being, welfare, interest, gain, profit; in someone's interests, to someone's advantage
  • 3 (for God's or goodness', Christ's, heaven's, Pete's etc. sake) Used to express impatience, annoyance, urgency, or desperation: ‘Oh, for God’s sake!’ snarled Dyson where did you get it, for heaven’s sake?
    More example sentences
    • Impatient mothers began urging their charges to finish up, for heaven's sake, so they could get dressed.
    • He interviewed me, much to my mortification - people want him, not me for heaven's sake, but he knew what he was doing.
    • But if you have to ride into town on such an old horse, for heaven's sake, ride it properly - or at least teach the poor beast a few new tricks.

Phrases

for old times' sake

In memory of former times; in acknowledgement of a shared past: they sat in the back seats for old times' sake
More example sentences
  • He has also handed in his training permit as well, though he may take the old boy to some point-to-point meetings just for old times' sake.
  • Perhaps it was for old times' sake and to recall fond memories - like the night I watched my wife playing hold'em: She held a king-high straight flush against a man who held the bottom end of the straight flush, queen-high.
  • If you think I'm romanticising, look at the success of Friends Reunited among people who want to exchange e-mails for old times' sake.

Origin

Old English sacu 'contention, crime', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zaak and German Sache, from a base meaning 'affair, legal action, thing'. The phrase for the sake of may be from Old Norse.

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 2 definitions of sake in English:

sake2

Line breaks: sake
Pronunciation: /ˈsɑːki
 
, ˈsakeɪ
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
  • A Japanese alcoholic drink made from fermented rice, traditionally drunk warm in small porcelain cups.
    More example sentences
    • Shiru-Bay also has a great selection of cold and hot sakes and Martinis.
    • When you drink with others, it's a Japanese etiquette to pour sake into each other's cup. You should hold your cup up when someone is serving sake to you.
    • Commonly called sake outside of Japan, nihonshu or sake (note that "sake" is also the general Japanese term for alcohol) is brewed using rice, water and white koji mold as the main ingredients.

Origin

Japanese.

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