Definition of scarab in English:

scarab

Line breaks: scarab
Pronunciation: /ˈskarəb
 
/

noun

  • 1 (also sacred scarab) A large dung beetle of the eastern Mediterranean area, regarded as sacred in ancient Egypt.
    • Scarabaeus sacer, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab family). The scarab family also includes the smaller dung beetles and chafers, together with some very large tropical kinds such as Hercules, goliath, and rhinoceros beetles
    More example sentences
    • The scarabs appeared to have left the area, but there was no telling when they would return.
    • For the moment, the scarabs were lost from sight.
    • The wife of King Albert, Queen Paola, commissioned Fabre, who used the jewel-like shells of scarabs culled from the Far East.
  • 1.1An ancient Egyptian gem cut in the form of a scarab beetle, sometimes depicted with the wings spread, and engraved with hieroglyphs on the flat underside.
    More example sentences
    • The most common Egyptian amulet was the scarab, made in the form of a sacred beetle, and this design continued to be used in early Greek and Etruscan work.
    • They included an Egyptian scarab whose hieroglyphics told how Amen Hotep III of the 18th dynasty shot 102 fierce lions with his own bow.
    • You can get an ancient oil lamp for about $75 or so, or a multitude of Egyptian scarabs and Roman Fibulae for even less, or coins of the ancient world from $20 and up.
  • 1.2Any scarabaeid beetle.

Origin

late 16th century (originally denoting a beetle of any kind): from Latin scarabaeus, from Greek skarabeios.

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