There are 4 definitions of scat in English:

scat1

Line breaks: scat
Pronunciation: /skat
 
/

verb (scats, scatting, scatted)

[no object, usually in imperative] informal
Go away; leave: Scat! Leave me alone
More example sentences
  • There's no political favoritism here, so scat, you malicious muckrakers.
  • Vyk exclaimed stopping Darryn from his own question and then telling his driver to scat.

Origin

mid 19th century: perhaps an abbreviation of scatter, or perhaps from the sound of a hiss (used to drive an animal away) + -cat.

Definition of scat in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous

There are 4 definitions of scat in English:

scat2

Line breaks: scat
Pronunciation: /skat
 
/

noun

(also scat singing) [mass noun]
Improvised jazz singing in which the voice is used in imitation of an instrument: [as modifier]: a scat rendition scat samples
More example sentences
  • Armstrong's scat singing also influenced the singing technique of bebop innovator Dizzy Gillespie, who first began recording bebop in 1944 with saxophonist Charlie Parker.
  • Mel Collins' squawking sax combines with Boz Burrell's scat singing on ‘Peoria’ to produce the closest they ever got to funk.
  • In particular the album's opening few moments feature some fairly rank scat singing which had me jumping for the skip button.

verb (scats, scatting, scatted)

[no object] Back to top  
Sing using the voice in imitation of an instrument: she scats and harmonizes simultaneously (as noun scatting) some gentle scatting
More example sentences
  • The man in the video starts scatting, familiar and quaint at first but soon his voice starts evoking everything from Appalachian folk to an angel-dust fit.
  • In doing so, he proves himself to be one of the more expressive singers around, free of melismatic acrobatics and, fortunately, scatting.
  • Nightworks is their debut album, redolent with thick house beats, whooshey keyboards, horns, saxes, scatting…

Origin

1920s: probably imitative.

Definition of scat in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous

There are 4 definitions of scat in English:

scat3

Line breaks: scat
Pronunciation: /skat
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
Droppings, especially those of carnivorous mammals: fresh bear scat [count noun]: samples of scats from otters wolf scats
More example sentences
  • Over several weeks, I collected carnivore scat similar to that I had seen gathered by waxbills and stored it in a freezer.
  • Using scat allows sample collection without disturbing the focal animal.
  • Other animals are known to use scat for surprising purposes; larval tortoise beetles pile fecal shields on their backs to protect them from predators.

Origin

1950s: from Greek skōr, skat- 'dung'.

Definition of scat in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous

There are 4 definitions of scat in English:

scat4

Line breaks: scat
Pronunciation: /skat
 
/

noun

A small deep-bodied silvery fish that lives in inshore and estuarine waters of the Indo-Pacific.

Origin

1960s: abbreviation of modern Latin Scatophagidae, from Greek skatophagos 'dung-eating' (because the fish is often found beside sewage outlets).

Definition of scat in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous