Definition of scathe in English:

scathe

Line breaks: scathe
Pronunciation: /skeɪð
 
/
archaic

verb

[with object and usually with negative]
1Harm; injure: he was barely scathed
More example sentences
  • He'd been hit a few times, but for someone of his magnitude, it barely scathed him.
1.1 literary Damage or destroy by fire or lightning: the pine tree scathed by lightning-fire
More example sentences
  • The little wiry bushes that grow all over Yosemite seem to be barely scathed by the flames in places, a tribute to their hardiness.

noun

[mass noun] Back to top  
Harm; injury: it was cheering to hear that you had got through winter and diphtheria without scathe

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse skathi (noun), skatha (verb); related to Dutch and German schaden (verb).

Derivatives

scatheless

adjective

Definition of scathe in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day vituperate
Pronunciation: vɪˈtjuːpəreɪt
verb
blame or insult (someone) in strong language...