Definition of scope in English:

scope

Line breaks: scope
Pronunciation: /skəʊp
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
  • 2The opportunity or possibility to do or deal with something: the scope for major change is always limited by political realities
    More example sentences
    • It became, as a direct consequence, a field where limited opportunities gave plenty of scope for those who were established to exploit those who were eager aspirants.
    • First, the techniques of self-help may create scope for opportunism on the part of secured as against unsecured creditors.
    • For this reason the broadest possible geographical scope for the law of international watercourses is to be preferred.
    Synonyms
    opportunity, freedom, latitude, leeway, capacity, liberty, room, room to manoeuvre, elbow room, play; possibility, chance
  • 2.1 archaic A purpose, end, or intention: Plato even maintains religion to be the chief aim and scope of human life
  • 3 informal A telescope, microscope, or other device having a name ending in -scope: infrared night scopes
    More example sentences
    • The presence of a minimum of two big spotting scopes is usually the key field mark.
    • Fossils were measured under a dissecting scope using a calibrated ocular micrometer.
    • F 1 progeny were scored under a dissecting scope for suppression or enhancement of the KDN rough eye phenotype.
  • 4 Nautical The length of cable extended when a ship rides at anchor.
  • 5 Linguistics & Logic The number of terms or arguments affected by an operator such as a quantifier or conjunction.
    More example sentences
    • An operator (like always) within a relative clause does not like to take wider scope than operators outside the relative.
    • The claim is that the ambiguity can be resolved entirely in terms of syntactic scope.
    • The claim, of course, was that referential uses of a description are a function of pragmatics, not quantifier scope.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1 (scope something out) Assess or investigate something: they’d scoped out their market
  • 1.1Set the scope of (a projected undertaking): it is important that a project is scoped correctly to ensure the budget can be accurately defined
    More example sentences
    • A ' Futures Team ' is being set up whose purpose is to scope out future innovations for the West Midlands.
    • At least there was plenty of empty ground on which to scope out a hurried new design.
    • Like methods, properties are scoped to their enclosing interface declaration.
  • 2North American informal Look at carefully; scan: they watched him scoping the room, looking for Michael
    More example sentences
    • Let alone getting 250 grand a year to play a bit of footy, in between scoping the scene at Burleigh Heads.
    • Grigory was three miles due west of Natalya's position, scoping out the scene.
    • Then a couple of white guys, hunched over, scoping out the street, looking to score.

Origin

mid 16th century (in the sense 'target for shooting at'): from Italian scopo 'aim', from Greek skopos 'target', from skeptesthai 'look out'. sense 3 of the noun is derived from -scope.

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