There are 2 main definitions of scout in English:

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scout1

Line breaks: scout
Pronunciation: /skaʊt
 
/

noun

1A soldier or other person sent out ahead of a main force so as to gather information about the enemy’s position, strength, or movements: forward scouts reported that the enemy were massing at two points ahead [as modifier]: a scout vehicle
More example sentences
  • Then, Spetnaz troops and scouts were sent ahead of the armor to eliminate RPG-armed snipers.
  • Four days had passed before Lord Light ordered his force to a halt, and sent scouts out ahead to find the disposition of the bridge.
  • Now we have sent one of the village's best scouts to gather further information, so that our village will be prepared for an attack.
Synonyms
lookout, lookout man/woman, outrider, advance guard, vanguard, spy;
1.1 [usually in singular] An instance of gathering information, especially by reconnoitring an area: I returned from a lengthy scout round the area
More example sentences
  • With a preliminary scout of the area and a sketch map, we were someway nearer as to understanding where everything was in relation to each other.
  • He fancied a scout round Victoria but I told him I preferred Wapping instead.
  • I want to have a quick scout round.
Synonyms
exploration, search, expedition
informal recce
British informal shufti
North American informal recon
1.2A ship or aircraft employed for reconnaissance, especially a small, fast aircraft: a single-seater scout
More example sentences
  • There are thirty fighters, two scouts, ten bombers, and three long range fighters.
  • We sent a picket ship as a scout, your government destroyed half of it, and stole all the remains.
  • Of course, that suggestion had been shot down faster than a Spectral scout.
2 short for talent scout. Brock slid the ball in from 14 yards to impress watching scouts
More example sentences
  • While his arm strength is considered good, Rodgers threw the ball downfield twice in the four games the scout watched.
  • Mornington were so successful that league clubs sent scouts to watch a number of the players.
  • Udrih is a good ballhandler who impressed scouts with his shooting and play off the pick-and-roll.
Synonyms
3 (also Scout) A member of the Scout Association or a similar organization: [as modifier]: a scout leader
More example sentences
  • The teenager had progressed through the Cubs and Scouts to become a Venture Scout.
  • The party of local Beavers, Cubs, Scouts, leaders and family members made the journey by coach.
  • Years later, I was an active member of the local Scout movement.
4 (also scout bee) A honeybee that searches for a new site for a swarm to settle or for a new food source.
Example sentences
  • When a honeybee colony requires a new hive site, honeybee scouts search for a cavity of suitable location, dryness, and size.
  • A honeybee scout may advertise one site over a period of days, but she repeatedly inspects her choice.
  • During each visit to her candidate site, the scout wanders through it, approaching nest mates and touching them with her antennae.
6 informal , dated A man or boy: I’ve got nothing against old Adrian—he’s a good scout

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1Make a search for someone or something in various places: I was sent to scout around for a place to park the camper we scouted for clues
More example sentences
  • I scouted for evidence of a stuck or injured fox, but found nothing.
  • In fact, that was the Congress' Achilles heel as it scouted for more supporters.
  • The policy should simplify the funding process for film-makers who previously had to scout around for money from various departments project by project.
Synonyms
1.1(Especially of a soldier) go ahead of a main force so as to gather information about an enemy’s position, strength, or movements: outriders went scouting for small settlements to loot
More example sentences
  • Quickly flicking the C stick down will activate the gadget, and it often comes in quite handy while scouting for enemy soldiers.
  • As fire burned from where the bunkers once stood, Joe's remaining troops went ahead to scout for any enemy forces left.
  • Clement halted his army and signaled for his scout to ride ahead of the army to scout for enemies ahead.
1.2 [with object] Explore or examine (a place or area of business) so as to gather information about it: American companies are keen to scout out business opportunities
More example sentences
  • Wilmer found and fell in love with his studio, a former warehouse, on his first day scouting business space in Sausalito.
  • The project is now scouting summit sites in areas with large exoffender populations and plans to hold five summits by the end of 2005.
  • The airline is scouting new areas for market expansion in the region and has singled out St Lucia.
Synonyms
reconnoitre, explore, take a look at, make a reconnaissance of, inspect, investigate, spy out, survey, make a survey of;
examine, scan, study, observe;
see how the land lies, find out the lie of the land
informal recce, make a recce of, check out, case, case the joint
British informal take a shufti round, suss out
North American informal recon
1.3Look for suitably talented people for recruitment to one’s own organization or sports team: Butcher has been scouting for United
More example sentences
  • The idea is not to scout for talented cricketers for the Indian women's team but to make women come out of their homes and play the game.
  • If Missouri loses a great prospect or two because other teams are scouting and making living-room pitches, the impact will linger.
  • That made NBA teams a little wary of him, especially teams that want to scout in China.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): from Old French escouter 'listen', earlier ascolter, from Latin auscultare. sense 5 of the noun (early 18th century) is of uncertain origin.

More
  • Scouts go ahead of a main force to gather information about an enemy's position and strength. The root of the word scout implies that the first scouts used their ears to pick up clues rather than making visual observations, as it is Latin auscultare ‘to listen to’. The English soldier Lord Baden-Powell admired the skills and resilience of these military scouts, and had also seen the successful use of boys as scouts by the Boers in southern Africa. In the summer of 1907 he organized a camp for boys on Brownsea Island in Dorset, and the following year founded the Scout Association to develop boys' characters by training them in self-sufficiency and survival techniques. The organization now exists worldwide, and has admitted girls since 1990. Scout's honour is the oath members take that they will stand by a promise or tell the truth.

Phrases

Scout's honour

1
The oath taken by a Scout.
informal 1.1 Used to indicate that one has the honourable standards associated with Scouts, and so will stand by a promise or tell the truth: ‘Did you mention about a job for Leslie to him?’ Veronica asked. ‘Not yet, but I will, Scout’s honour,’ Jimmy assured her
More example sentences
  • ‘Okay, I won't do anything irrational,’ I said as I lifted up my hands, put up my first two fingers and folded the rest back,‘Scout's honour.’
  • I'll be there tomorrow night, Scout's honor!
  • He'll watch his mouth next time, Scout's honor.

Derivatives

scouter

1
noun
Example sentences
  • All the stalls had such scouters who would at times even cling on to your clothes, in an attempt to lure you into buying their absolutely undesirable concoctions.
  • Most of those in the off-stage audience were handed invitations by scouters who scoped the city for folks with ‘the look’.
  • The thin circles are patrols, the thicker squares are scouters, the large ovals are divisions, and the rectangles are squadrons.

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There are 2 main definitions of scout in English:

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scout2

Line breaks: scout
Pronunciation: /skaʊt
 
/

verb

[with object] rare
Reject (a proposal or idea) with scorn: he scouts the claim that the aristocrats cared much for the art treasures their ancestors had bought
More example sentences
  • Despite her tender letters to her guru, he sensibly scouts the idea that the two were lovers.

Origin

early 17th century: of Scandinavian origin; compare with Old Norse skúta, skúti 'a taunt'.

More
  • Scouts go ahead of a main force to gather information about an enemy's position and strength. The root of the word scout implies that the first scouts used their ears to pick up clues rather than making visual observations, as it is Latin auscultare ‘to listen to’. The English soldier Lord Baden-Powell admired the skills and resilience of these military scouts, and had also seen the successful use of boys as scouts by the Boers in southern Africa. In the summer of 1907 he organized a camp for boys on Brownsea Island in Dorset, and the following year founded the Scout Association to develop boys' characters by training them in self-sufficiency and survival techniques. The organization now exists worldwide, and has admitted girls since 1990. Scout's honour is the oath members take that they will stand by a promise or tell the truth.

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