There are 2 definitions of scruff in English:

scruff1

Line breaks: scruff
Pronunciation: /skrʌf
 
/

noun

The back of a person’s or animal’s neck: he grabbed him by the scruff of his neck
More example sentences
  • The latter song further displayed M.E's new found audience sympathy by dragging a bouncer from the mosh pit by the scruff of his neck for starting on a fan who'd been getting a bit carried away.
  • SAC has never taken the Fringe by the scruff of its neck and said, ‘How can we use it for our own purposes?’
  • Plus, any band who produce We Care A Lot, a brutally fun hymn for the apathy generation is bound to grab any world-weary fifteen year old by the scruff of the neck.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Grasp (an animal) by the scruff of its neck.
More example sentences
  • Do you have any idea what it feels like to be seized, scruffed, taken like an animal when you're in heat and feeling like one anyhow?

Origin

late 18th century: alteration of dialect scuff, of obscure origin.

Definition of scruff in:

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude

There are 2 definitions of scruff in English:

scruff2

Line breaks: scruff
Pronunciation: /skrʌf
 
/

noun

British informal
A person with a dirty or untidy appearance.

Origin

early 16th century (in the sense 'scurf'): variant of scurf. The word came to mean 'worthless thing', whence the current sense (mid 19th century).

Definition of scruff in: