There are 2 main definitions of scud in English:

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scud1

Line breaks: scud
Pronunciation: /skʌd
 
/

verb (scuds, scudding, scudded)

1 [no object, with adverbial of direction] Move fast in a straight line because or as if driven by the wind: we lie watching the clouds scudding across the sky three small ships were scudding before a brisk breeze
More example sentences
  • Her opponent would send the ball scudding across the net.
  • Sunlight broke through the clouds, islands of light scudding across the countryside.
  • She looked upward, and witnessed several small clouds scudding across the sky, as if bent on a happy errand as she was herself.
Synonyms
speed, race, sail, streak, shoot, sweep, skim, whip, whizz, whoosh, buzz, zoom, flash, blast, career;
hare, fly, wing, kite, skite, scurry, flit, scutter, hurry, hasten, rush
informal belt, scoot, scorch, tear, zap, zip
British informal bomb, bucket, shift
North American informal boogie, hightail, clip
North American vulgar slang drag/tear/haul ass
informal , dated cut along
2 [with object] chiefly Scottish Slap, beat, or spank: she scudded me across the head

noun

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1chiefly literary A mass of vapoury clouds or spray driven fast by the wind: the water is glassy under a scud of mist [mass noun]: the picturesque shoreline disappeared into low-cloud scud and rain
1.1A driving shower of rain or snow; a gust: scuds of rain gave way to sun
More example sentences
  • It was still memorable to see the shifting shadows and scuds of rain across the lake and the green volcanic hills - and it all lit up with sunshine and breathtaking scenery on the final day.
1.2 [mass noun] The action of moving fast in a straight line when driven by the wind: the scud of the clouds before the wind
2 (Scud or Scud missile) A type of long-range surface-to-surface guided missile able to be fired from a mobile launcher.
[a code name assigned by NATO to a series of such missiles developed by the former Soviet Union]
Example sentences
  • Because the Scud missile tended to breakup during the final phase of its trajectory (re-entry into the atmosphere), multiple targets would appear on the radar screen.
  • Let's all admit it right up front: We'd like to see that guy launched through the bar's window like a human Scud missile.
  • I just don't think people are going to, you know, get in the mine shaft and fall between the slats and say here's a Scud missile and here's the weapon of mass destruction.

Origin

mid 16th century (as a verb): perhaps an alteration of the noun scut1, thus reflecting the sense 'race like a hare'.

More
  • scuttle from (Old English):

    There are three main scuttles in English. The one you keep coal in meant a dish in Old English and comes via Old Norse from Latin scutella ‘dish’. The one for moving is probably from dialect scuddle from scud (mid 16th century) ‘move quickly’, which may have come from scut (Late Middle English) originally meaning a hare, but now better known as the tail of a hare or rabbit. This would give scud an original meaning similar to the modern informal ‘to hare along’ for to move quickly. The scuttle of a ship is first found as a noun meaning ‘hatchway’ at the end of the 15th century, and only as a verb ‘to sink’ from the mid 17th. It may come, via French, from Spanish escotilla ‘hatchway’.

Words that rhyme with scud

blood, bud, crud, cud, dud, flood, Judd, mud, rudd, spud, stud, sudd, thud

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There are 2 main definitions of scud in English:

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scud2

Line breaks: scud
Pronunciation: /skʌd
 
/

noun

(in phrase in the scud or scuddy) Scottish
(Of a person) naked.
Example sentences
  • Mary and her husband Dave first sampled the joys of disporting themselves in the scud on the beaches of Ibiza and decided to attempt to replicate the liberating experience in Scotland.

Origin

early 19th century: of uncertain origin.

More
  • scuttle from (Old English):

    There are three main scuttles in English. The one you keep coal in meant a dish in Old English and comes via Old Norse from Latin scutella ‘dish’. The one for moving is probably from dialect scuddle from scud (mid 16th century) ‘move quickly’, which may have come from scut (Late Middle English) originally meaning a hare, but now better known as the tail of a hare or rabbit. This would give scud an original meaning similar to the modern informal ‘to hare along’ for to move quickly. The scuttle of a ship is first found as a noun meaning ‘hatchway’ at the end of the 15th century, and only as a verb ‘to sink’ from the mid 17th. It may come, via French, from Spanish escotilla ‘hatchway’.

Derivatives

scuddy

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • What he doesn't know is that Marsh is putting in the hours in the darkroom, producing loads of extra prints, cropping in on the scuddy bits and hawking them as high-class porn.

Definition of scud in:

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