There are 3 definitions of scuttle in English:

scuttle1

Line breaks: scut¦tle
Pronunciation: /ˈskʌt(ə)l
 
/

noun

  • 1A metal container with a handle, used to fetch and store coal for a domestic fire.
  • 1.1The amount of coal held in a scuttle: carrying endless scuttles of coal up from the cellar
    More example sentences
    • Half a scuttle of coal 2-3 times/day is required to keep the fire burning.
  • 2British The part of a car’s bodywork between the windscreen and the bonnet.
    More example sentences
    • Pop-up bonnets are not sufficient to eliminate head contact with the stiff windscreen scuttle and the A pillar, especially in small cars, and windscreen airbags are being developed to cover these stiffer regions.
    • No scuttle shake or rattles were detected, a good sign that the aluminium chassis is all that its cracked up to be.
    • The S2000 has no scuttle shake, that bane of soft tops, because it uses what Honda calls an X-bone frame.

Origin

late Old English scutel 'dish, platter', from Old Norse skutill, from Latin scutella 'dish'.

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Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmeɪlstrəm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea

There are 3 definitions of scuttle in English:

scuttle2

Line breaks: scut¦tle
Pronunciation: /ˈskʌt(ə)l
 
/

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction]
  • Run hurriedly or furtively with short quick steps: a mouse scuttled across the floor
    More example sentences
    • In other contemporaneous drawings, the fish bodies seem to have morphed into billowing sails and scuttling deep-sea crustaceans.
    • Meanwhile, rows of new swiveling, scuttling ergonomic chairs line the walls.
    • Sartre also, Marie-Denise Boros points out, was particularly fond of the crab, a creature which scuttles its way into everything from his philosophical texts to his plays.
    Synonyms
    scamper, scurry, scramble, bustle, skip, trot, hurry, hasten, make haste, rush, race, dash, run, sprint; British scutter
    informal scoot, beetle

noun

[in singular] Back to top  

Origin

late 15th century: compare with dialect scuddle, frequentative of scud1.

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There are 3 definitions of scuttle in English:

scuttle3

Line breaks: scut¦tle
Pronunciation: /ˈskʌt(ə)l
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Sink (one’s own ship) deliberately by holing it or opening its seacocks to let water in: the ship was scuttled by its German prize crew, who took to the boats
    More example sentences
    • The gallant heroism of both the British Navy and the German Captain Langsdorff, who scuttles his own ship rather than face defeat, strongly appealed to Powell and Pressburger.
    • A Soviet sub carrying rotten caviar and toxic waste cabbage broth is scuttled and the oozing brew burbles into the depths of the ocean.
  • 2Deliberately cause (a scheme) to fail: some of the stockholders are threatening to scuttle the deal
    More example sentences
    • He was an outspoken critic of the show when it began, mostly because it scuttled his own plans for a Galactica reboot that would pick up where the 1978 version left off.
    • As such, she doesn't get out much, since her few attempts at dating are scuttled by the conspicuous presence of her bodyguards.
    • Kunuk comes off as a sentimentalist, scuttling his attempts to inflate his story into something bigger, leaving remains that feel as psychologically uncomplicated as the similarly themed The Lion King.

noun

Back to top  
  • An opening with a cover in a ship’s deck or side: a shaft of sunlight blazed through the cabin scuttle

Origin

late 15th century (as a noun): perhaps from Old French escoutille, from the Spanish diminutive escotilla 'hatchway'. The verb dates from the mid 17th century.

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