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shamble

Line breaks: sham¦ble
Pronunciation: /ˈʃamb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of shamble in English:

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction]
(Of a person) move with a slow, shuffling, awkward gait: he shambled off down the corridor
More example sentences
  • Here we are shambling and wounded and lonely at the end of the world.
  • After the short ceremony, these loutish tourists shambled off in their jeans and high nuisance-factor anoraks.
  • Josh Davis has just shambled on to the stage, pottering about and digging through a tatty backpack for cartridges and CDs.
Synonyms

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
A slow, shuffling, awkward gait: he adopted a humorous apelike shamble
More example sentences
  • Fans are used to Young's laid-back stage presence, the hunched shoulders, eyes often masked by cap or hat, the trademark shamble and lurch.
  • After two minutes of stumbling, the song switches gears, grinding against itself before going for a brief jaunt, and then concluding with a reprisal of the introductory shamble.
  • It began its slow shamble towards the car, ignoring the headlights that cut through the fog in front of it and shone in its eyes.

Origin

late 16th century: probably from dialect shamble 'ungainly', perhaps from the phrase shamble legs, with reference to the legs of trestle tables (such as would be used in a meat market: see shambles).

Derivatives

shambly

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • There I found Hungarian family entertainment at its height at the shambly 19th century Szechenyi baths.

Definition of shamble in:

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