There are 2 main definitions of sledge in English:

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sledge1

Line breaks: sledge
Pronunciation: /slɛdʒ
 
/
chiefly British

noun

1A vehicle on runners for conveying loads or passengers over snow or ice, often pulled by draught animals: a dog sledge [as modifier]: a sledge journey
More example sentences
  • During their historic trek across the constantly moving ocean the women first pulled their 250 lb sledges of food and equipment over house-sized pressure ridges of ice and sat out blizzards.
  • Led by accomplished Polar explorer Jim McNeill, the group will pull sledges weighing up to 250 lb for up to 10 hours a day 210 miles to the Magnetic Pole.
  • The Manchester University academic and a pal are heading to the Greenland Icecap on sledges pulled by giant kites.
1.1A small lightweight vehicle, either on runners or having a smooth bottom surface, used for sliding downhill over snow or ice.
Example sentences
  • Tea trays, as we all know are ten times better than any sledge or toboggan you can buy in the shops, and have the added advantage of being useful as giant frisbees when the snow melts.
  • We discovered that as we had gotten older, we'd gotten taller and larger to the point that sitting on a sledge tends to make it sink into the snow rather than fly screaming towards the trees at the bottom.
  • Children across York and North Yorkshire reached for their sledges yesterday as a dusting of snow transformed much of the county into a winter wonderland.

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction] Back to top  
1Ride on a sledge: they sledged down the slopes in the frozen snow (as noun sledging) I love sledging
More example sentences
  • We would seek to avoid obtruding on to the slopes traditionally used for sledging, or to restrict the area used by horse riders.
  • For any kids who have not burnt enough energy during the day, there's a perfect slope across the road to go sledging in safety.
  • She said: ‘This is the first time they have been sledging.’
1.1 [with object and adverbial of direction] Carry (passengers or a load) on a sledge: the task of sledging 10-metre lifeboats across tundra
More example sentences
  • All the material for the house had to be sledged up the hill by horse.
  • Another was sledged almost halfway up Mount Taranaki, to provide accommodation for visitors.
  • That afternoon we made our expedition sledging flags.

Origin

late 16th century (as a noun): from Middle Dutch sleedse; related to sled. The verb dates from the early 18th century.

More
  • The sledge that is a vehicle used on snow and ice came in the late 16th century from Dutch and is related to sled (Middle English), sleigh (early 18th century), slide (Old English), and slither (Middle English). Sleigh is from Dutch, and was originally adopted in North America. To take for a sleigh ride is a dated slang phrase meaning ‘to mislead’, from the use of sleigh ride for an implausible or false story or a hoax. A sleigh ride could also mean ‘a drug-induced high’—this went with the use of snow for cocaine in white powder form, an early 20th-century use for this Old English word. As a name for what we would now more usually call a sledgehammer, the other sledge is recorded in Old English and goes back to a root meaning ‘to strike’ and related to slay. A sledgehammer is a large, heavy hammer used for jobs such as breaking rocks and driving in fence posts, so to take a sledgehammer to crack a nut is to use a disproportionately forceful means to achieve a simple objective. The expression is recorded in the 1930s, but a decade earlier an American version use a sledgehammer to kill a gnat appears. In the 1970s Australian cricketers started sledging, or making offensive or needling remarks to opposing batsmen in an attempt to break their concentration. The idea behind the term is the crudity and lack of subtlety involved in using a sledge or sledgehammer.

Derivatives

sledger

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The Sledger's Handbook is a series of light-hearted observations on cricket's foremost insults and most controversial events.
  • Merv was a master sledger, his yelling and screaming similar to what Muhammad Ali did to Sonny Liston in 64.

Words that rhyme with sledge

allege, dredge, edge, fledge, hedge, kedge, ledge, pledge, reg, sedge, veg, wedge

Definition of sledge in:

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There are 2 main definitions of sledge in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

sledge2

Line breaks: sledge
Pronunciation: /slɛdʒ
 
/

noun

A sledgehammer.
Example sentences
  • Their guitars hammer away like sledges to anvils while the rhythm section is hot enough to melt steel!
  • Steel wedges were driven into the fault and hammered with a sledge until the stone separated.
  • Go find a hammer: a claw, a sledge, a ball-peen, whatever's handy.

verb

[with object] (usually as noun sledging) Cricket Back to top  
(Of a fielder) make offensive remarks to (an opposing batsman) in order to break their concentration: they will be remembered for their sledging as much as for their skill he had resorted to sledging Stewart
More example sentences
  • I had plenty of faith in my bowlers to get the batsmen out without sledging them.
  • Obstruction is now a part of the game, so too sledging, so too verbal intimidation of referees.
  • Asian and black players have long complained that abuse during matches, known as sledging, had taken on a racial tone when directed at them.

Origin

Old English slecg (noun), from a Germanic base meaning 'to strike', related to slay1. The current sense of the verb dates from the late 20th century.

More
  • The sledge that is a vehicle used on snow and ice came in the late 16th century from Dutch and is related to sled (Middle English), sleigh (early 18th century), slide (Old English), and slither (Middle English). Sleigh is from Dutch, and was originally adopted in North America. To take for a sleigh ride is a dated slang phrase meaning ‘to mislead’, from the use of sleigh ride for an implausible or false story or a hoax. A sleigh ride could also mean ‘a drug-induced high’—this went with the use of snow for cocaine in white powder form, an early 20th-century use for this Old English word. As a name for what we would now more usually call a sledgehammer, the other sledge is recorded in Old English and goes back to a root meaning ‘to strike’ and related to slay. A sledgehammer is a large, heavy hammer used for jobs such as breaking rocks and driving in fence posts, so to take a sledgehammer to crack a nut is to use a disproportionately forceful means to achieve a simple objective. The expression is recorded in the 1930s, but a decade earlier an American version use a sledgehammer to kill a gnat appears. In the 1970s Australian cricketers started sledging, or making offensive or needling remarks to opposing batsmen in an attempt to break their concentration. The idea behind the term is the crudity and lack of subtlety involved in using a sledge or sledgehammer.

Derivatives

sledger

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The chilly weather also saw ramblers and day-trippers take in the fresh country air in beauty spots throughout Derbyshire with Mam Torr proving popular with sledgers.
  • They advise sledgers to don protective gear and not to go out without parental supervision.
  • Hayden's style is that of a bully, both as a batsman and as a notorious sledger.

Definition of sledge in:

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